Campus News

Important dates, reminders, and campus information.

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Coleman is Ranked #1 in San Diego!

Recently our University was pleased to find that we had been ranked number one in San Diego for Cybersecurity degrees by Universities.com. If you did not already know, Coleman has had the longest running Cybersecurity (formerly Network Security) degree program in San Diego. Since 1963 when we first began our journey as The Automation Institute, our organization has been at the center of technology development and we have graduated many distinguished alumni over our 54 years in Southern California. From Data Processing to Cybersecurity we have come a long way by following the trends and seeing the potential in every student that walks through our door.  Our alumni have gone on to work for SPAWAR, Cisco, Kyocera, and many other incredible companies that are the leaders in technology development. With our lifetime Career Services access and small class sizes our students have been able to create lucrative careers in exciting fields. More importantly, they have brought integrity to the Coleman name and we are proud to continue to provide a top Cybersecurity education for San Diego. Our mission statement is “To deliver relevant education that prepares individuals for technology focused careers, while providing an environment where they may develop to their full potential” and we will remain dedicated to that mission long into our future. This is exciting news for our university and we are so happy to share it with our followers and alumni!!

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Coleman and Ssubi give back to San Diego

Our President, Norbert Kubilus, stands next to the donated computers from Sharp Healthcare that Coleman will be helping to refurbish. Ssubi is located behind the Graduate Studies building. 

Coleman University’s mission statement is “To deliver relevant education that prepares individuals for technology-focused careers, while providing an environment where they may develop to their full potential”. That mission statement is not just focused on our learning environments. Our emphasis on developing to a full potential also applies to the various opportunities that Coleman is bringing to our students that take place outside of the classroom and within our community. Since 2016 we have provided a portion of a warehouse for the non-profit Ssubi to operate out of, as well as encouraged our students to work with them to collect and ship donations around the world. This organization has taken on the enormous task of processing gently used medical equipment from local hospitals and clinics and distributing to areas in Africa that have no access to basic and essential medical materials. The founder, Laura Luxemburg, has worked tirelessly throughout Southern California to encourage the leaders in the Healthcare industry to be more conscious of their potential impact through conservation and to donate their equipment to communities who need it. It is her goal to bring jobs to our city in an environment that promotes conservation. Through efforts in connection with Sharp Healthcare and the San Diego Veterans Association, Laura has been successful in reaching the first part of her overall goal for Ssubi: the potential millions of tons of medical waste that can be reused are being saved from landfills. Sustainability is important for helping to make San Diego a Green city and Coleman University wants to be a part of that movement.

In conjunction with their effort called Greening for Good, Ssubi is also offering gently used computer equipment to low income families in San Diego. Our University has provided Ssubi with a center on our campus to clean, store, and refurbish 50 computers that were donated by Sharp Healthcare. Using the Cybersecurity Club room which serves as a lab on our campus, student volunteers are installing new software and returning the equipment to their factory settings. Once each computer has been cleaned, they will be donated to local shelters and families who may not have access to computer equipment. Computer and internet literacy are vital skills that will help every child become more successful in their academic careers. Coleman is dedicated to promoting this literacy effort and we are doing our part by donating equipment to help maintain an equal educational playing field for young learners and their parents. We hope to continue to work closely with Ssubi again in the future, and we look forward to seeing all of the delighted faces of the families who will be receiving these donations.

For more information on the on-going efforts of Ssubi please visit their website: http://www.ssubi.org/ or check out their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ssubiishope/

 

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Faculty Spotlight: Thomas Byrne (Cybersecurity Program)

Part of what makes Coleman University so unique to San Diego is the incredible faculty that we have on our campus. Technology and its development are not pastimes for our faculty; their careers and passions are built around it. We sat down with one of our Cybersecurity instructors, Mr. Thomas Byrne, to talk about his passion for technology and teaching. Hopefully we can show you something new and exciting about your instructors!

Mr. Byrne (far right) stands with his First Robotics Team at the Central Valley Regional in March of 2016. This photo was taken after the team had secured a spot in a semi-final for the second time that month!

1.So, Mr. Byrne, what drew you to technology and network security?

I grew up with technology and thinking back here are some of my memories: I was literally amazed at my first RED Led watch in the mid 1970’s as well as PONG, which I had hooked up to my TV. I thought to myself “this is the future, these digital readouts.”  Then one day in 1982 my father, who worked at McDonnell Douglas in Long Beach as a Branch Chief Engineer, brought home a Compupro 8/16. It ran CP/M off of 8-inch floppies. One of my favorite games to play on the computer was “Colossal Cave Adventure,” which was a text based adventure game that made you visualize the world you were exploring. I spent a lot of time exploring that cave and one day I got stuck in the cave and actually phoned the author for a game hint in the help file. That was cool, knowing that I could phone the creator of the game. The hint was “Did you get the axe? Did you throw the axe at the Minotaur?” Ooops! I also read a lot when I was a kid, and I eventually came across tech magazines in the electronics store. I read an article and found out that you could punch a hole on the back of that huge floppy to make it double sided; it was so exciting to learn that I could double my storage!  I learned to program in Assembly, which meant manipulating the CPU stack, and I watched my dad write code to track expenses and even predict when airplanes were flying overhead as they landed in LAX. I also received my HAM radio license back when you had to learn Morse code and was communicating with people in Japan and Germany… so that’s how I sort of got hooked on technology, it was my fun time. As for network security, I like to be secure and wanted to learn how to maintain my systems against threats. I saw all the virus activity and did not want to lose my data, so I researched how to stay safe online and really liked understanding how the hackers think and what motivates them. I also learned how vulnerable this technology is, and I wanted to do something about it.

2.How long have you been teaching at Coleman? What inspired you to become a teacher?

I was hired as an Instructor in August of 2010. Before that I was a corporate trainer for Luxottica. I always was someone who could learn and then explain almost any topic and gain insights on it. I really like helping people understand difficult concepts in cybersecurity. This is a huge positive, as a lot of the material can be difficult until you understand it. I try to make it easy to understand, so that my students can remember the material down the road and make use of that knowledge. I try my best to cut through the noise to the essence of what’s really important to know.

3.Do you have a piece of advice or information that you want all of your students to know before they graduate?

There is a job for you, as the world certainly needs trained cybersecurity professionals. It will not be handed to you though. One piece of advice I have is to be very flexible in your careers and gravitate to the areas that interest you. Learn everything you can about security and technology; we live in amazing times and the whole world is going through a digital transformation right now. The world needs your help, so study hard and keep up with all the changes in technology and security. The Internet is a great human resource, so use it; learn how to find good sources of information and never stop learning. It’s very important to learn to interact with others in a positive way and become a good communicator. Be a positive person. Technology is hard for many so help them understand it.

4.Where do you go for the most accurate and up-to-date information on what is happening in technology?

I take advantage of my commute time and listen to podcasts. I’ve got my podcast apps, and I can tie into any podcast out there. I listen to Google, Apple, Microsoft, Security Podcasts, etc. It really comes down to about five companies that are at the head of technology development. It is all interesting to watch and hear, like a big game to see who will come out with the next trend.

5.What are some basic tactics that you would recommend to the public, who may not be fully aware of online cyber risks?

First of all, don’t believe in total privacy online. If you’re on the Internet regularly, you are not doing it privately. If you’re using the Internet you’re going to be in some database somewhere. In regard to keeping your own computers and other devices secure, try not to click on links that you don’t recognize, use two-factor authentication whenever possible, have a password manager for your personal emails and other log-ins, keep up with the news, and don’t go to websites that you can’t verify. Most importantly, don’t allow any action on your devices that you do not personally approve. So if an email comes up with a link that you do not know, reverse it, call the company directly and ask if they contacted you. You need to initiate the connection instead of assuming a provided link is good.

6.What are you involved in outside of the classroom that involves technology development?

Well, I am a mentor for First Robotics. My son wanted to start a robotics club at his high school with two friends, after seeing that other schools around the city, such as Hi Tech High had them. They started a robotics team for Mission Hills High School in San Marcos. I met with them and let them know that I wanted to help out, so I met all the parents of the other students and we worked together to start a robotics team. It’s a lot of work! You have to form the team, and it costs about $4000 to compete in these competitions, so that takes a lot of fundraising. You’re given parameters like the weight of the robots, which has to be 120 pounds, and the cost, which has to be less than $4000, and so on. So you need to get sponsors. We got started in the robotics competitions in San Diego four years ago, and our first project was a defensive robot which was required to have the ability for aerial assist. In that first competition we placed 23rd out of 60 teams, which was pretty high for a rookie team, considering that some of the other teams had been doing this for at least ten years. From there we ended up going to St. Louis to compete, because we won Rookie All Star; we were up against teams from across the nation, but there are also about 30 countries that do this every year as well. Right now there are about 6,000 teams globally that are a part of this competition. We were up against the best and that motivated us to come back even better the next time. So in the following years we have been semi-finalists in both the national and international competitions. This year we were semi-final and quarter-finalists. There are a lot of scholarships attached to this, so students can get money from Boeing and other companies who are looking for engineers to sponsor. Our team is so successful because we have so many mentors who specialize in every aspect of building and implementing.

7.What is an up and coming technology or technology trend that you are really excited about?

Well people like to say that my head is in the clouds, because I am so invested in cloud computing! This is the next paradigm shift in major technology. A cloud service run by major corporations like Google and Microsoft provides the advantage of a powerful storage facility, with massive processing power, and servers that can shift their computing power to adapt to any situation. In regards to hacking, people are going to start seeing the value of the cloud, because it offers more security at less expense, and it is consistently updated. The ability to share and store information will connect the world and give everyone access to technology.

 

We want to thank Mr. Byrne for taking the time to tell us about himself and his passion for technology. Keeping students motivated and engaged is a full-time job and there is a lot more beneath the surface here than you might think. Join us again next month for another spotlight on our incredible faculty at Coleman University! If you would like to know more about First Robotics and the team that Mr. Byrne is mentoring follow the links below.

https://www.firstinspires.org/robotics/frc

https://www.facebook.com/team5137/

 

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Coleman University Students are Chosen as Semi-finalists in Robotics Development Competition for Mars Exploration!

Chase Thurmond (top right) is leading the ENVI team, along with Coleman students Hao Yu and Anthony Anderson (far left), in their autonomous robot project for Mars exploration. This team will be working on this throughout the spring in order to meet the summer 2017 due date.

Technology is not a static field; it changes daily, hourly, and minute by minute. Technology development isn’t even restricted by Earthly aspirations; developers are now looking to the skies again as their next target. Unmanned ground vehicles have become the latest topic for development and putting these autonomous droids on Mars is no longer just a dream. In early 2017 the Mars City Design Competition put out a call for student teams around the world and across the nation to submit their ideas for an autonomous robot or program that centers on the theme of “transportation” that could be used to help colonize Mars. Applicants had to submit a video explaining their project and what they felt it could contribute to Mars exploration, as well as a breakdown of how they would build their project and what materials they would use. Students from Coleman University, with the help of the expert engineers at ENVI, and lead by student Chase Thurmond, submitted the ENVI design for an autonomous and cooperative robot flock.  The ENVI team, hosted at Coleman University, was chosen as a semi-finalist!! Out of 135 applications, this project and its team of developers were chosen to be one of just 15 teams competing for the chance to see their projects come to life this summer and possibly become part of the race to Mars! Teams from all over the world including France, the UK, and South America are in this competition, vying for the top spot and global recognition as a leading developer in Mars exploration. Students from our Software Development, Cybersecurity, and Graduate Studies Program came together to build the first engineering concept for a cooperative “flock” of unmanned land robots that would essentially become the eyes and hands of astronauts or colonists living and working on Mars. The overall goal of Mars City Design is to promote the development of sustainable and efficient tools for a successful living community not just on Mars, but on future planets yet to be discovered and explored. The semi-finalists chosen for this project will be presenting a teaser of their design and vision at a fundraiser in Los Angeles on May 25th. We at Coleman University want to congratulate the students who took interest in an extracurricular opportunity to put this project into motion, and the dedicated team at ENVI who are mentoring them through this journey. We look forward to seeing the finished product! You can find more information on the other designs, previous winners, and track to competition from their website: https://marscitydesign.com/news.

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Tips for Developing a Well-Crafted Resume

This post was written by the Director of Career Services, Robert Sweigart in preparation for the upcoming Job Fair, on March 28, being hosted on our campus. Thank you to Mr. Sweigart and his team for working so hard to help our students find their dream careers! Contact your Career Services adviser for help with your resume, or email careerservices@coleman.edu.

At Coleman University, our diverse student population includes those seeking their first job, returning veterans, students interested in changing careers, and individuals returning to the workforce after a leave of absence. What they all have in common is the need to create an appealing, professional resume that catches an employer’s eye.

Today, employers spend only a few seconds on each resume they receive. Therefore, employees need to develop a resume that differentiates their work background from the competition. Coleman’s career services advisors work one-on-one with students to provide personalized professional development services, and our experience shows that when it comes to resumes, one size does not necessarily fit all.  There are requirements and recommendations that we have for each of our programs. What suits your resume is not guaranteed to work for your peers. The basics of a resume are the same, however each resume is unique. If you need help updating your resume or would like to have it reviewed make time to visit your Career Services Advisor as soon as possible so that we can help you get into the career you really want.

Candidates should thoroughly read the job description and tailor their resume to the needs of the company. Is the company interested only in candidates that hold a specific degree or certification? Does the company require candidates to submit a portfolio of their work? At Coleman, our graphic design and game development and design students are encouraged to refine their portfolios and post them online, so that they are easily accessible to employers. You do not need to bring an arsenal of technology and handouts to go with your resumes, but keep in mind that employers will search for your name online and it is pertinent to ensure that what they find will not disqualify you as a candidate. Update your portfolios, websites, or any other digital media that you curate, before you begin submitting resumes.

Keep in mind that many large and small companies utilize applicant tracking systems to assist in their recruiting efforts. These systems search for key words in your resume to add to their database. It is important that candidates include those key words from the job description so that they are not automatically disqualified before they even meet with an employer.

What other aspects should be considered when writing a resume?

  • Formatting is important. You may want to research resumes from peers in your field to determine whether there is a certain outline that should be followed, or speak with a career advisor. Use (but don’t overuse) bullet points. Avoid graphics, large blocks of single-spaced text, and varying font sizes.
  • Proper grammar and punctuation is critical. There is no place for slang words in a resume. If you have questions about grammar or punctuation, check out grammar books from the local library, view online sources, or seek out a career advisor or trusted friend for advice.
  • Place name, phone number(s), address, and e-mail address in the top left-hand corner. Create a professional e-mail address and take a professional photo for social media sites.
  • Write a succinct profile that highlights work experiences and the skills you have to offer an employer. This profile should entice a hiring manager to read further.
  • Resumes no longer include an objective. Instead, we recommend students write a summary of their skills, using bullet points to identify all the relevant abilities that pertain to the job for which they are applying.
  • The work experience section of the resume should include dates of employment in reverse chronological order, the name of organization, the physical location of the employer (city and state), the title of the position, and description of work responsibilities. Under each position, emphasize specific results generated (how you reduced costs, increased sales, overcame a challenge) and use action verbs.
  • Maintain a simple and direct resume. Do not exaggerate your experience or your qualifications as that is a good way to put yourself in a work situation that you may not be ready to handle. Be honest and concise with the information that you put onto your resume as it sets the tone for what an employer can expect from you as a potential employee, including your work ethics.
  • The Career Services Department strongly suggests avoiding using a template for your resume. Downloaded or borrowed templates are not guaranteed to look the same after they are sent off and employers will notice immediately if you have sent in a template resume, which will not work in your favor.

If you experienced a gap in employment due to illness or caring for a family member, be prepared to give a short response that explains the situation. Business Insider gives 3 tips for addressing a job gap: be honest and upfront, consider doing volunteer work or taking relevant classes, and, explain the skills acquired while you were out of work. Gaps in employment are not necessarily viewed as negative if it can be explained how time away from the workforce has strengthened your background as the perfect candidate for the job.

  • The education section should include the name of the institution, dates attended, and degree or degrees earned. Remember to include the major, minor, and important certifications. Make mention of academic awards if they are applicable to the position. Include a GPA if it is higher than 3.0, or if you do not have previous work experience.
  • Veterans are often concerned how to transferring their military experience into civilian terms. Many skills gained in the military, such as organization, leadership, responsibility, and technical ability can be easily translated to a civilian job.
  • Make sure that you include everything that an employer asks for with your resume submission, which may include a cover letter. The Harvard Business Review suggests a list of important cover letter aspects that will make your resume stand out. The Career Services Advisors at Coleman are here to help you with drafting your cover letters. Again, it is important that you make time to speak with them as soon as possible in order to be completely prepared for your career search.

Now that you have an understanding of what to include in a resume, we recommend omitting the following information:

  • Personal information, such as age, marital status, race, or number of dependent children need not be included. Hobbies should be mentioned, only if they are applicable to the job. There is also no need to include high school graduation information.
  • Irrelevant work history and nonessential extracurricular activities should not be listed. Think of your resume as your personal “elevator speech.” Only include work experience that highlights relevant skills and experience.
  • All employers expect job applicants to have references, so there is no need to include a statement such as, “References will be furnished upon request.”
  • It has become a more common practice among employers to seek out the private social media profiles of candidates in order to gain better insight into an applicant’s background. However, there is no need to include links or information pertaining to your personal social media profiles on your resume. It can be beneficial to include a link to your LinkedIn profile, so make sure that you have updated your LinkedIn before you start applying to employment opportunities. However, that is not something you are required to provide as part of a resume submission.

While we all live in a fast-paced world, it is important to take time with the resume process. Developing a carefully constructed resume could be the difference between hiring you, or the competition, for the next “dream” job.

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Running is her passion: Leia Guillermo, Student Services, Coleman University

What would it take for you to run 23 miles in three days? Would you do it for money, fame, bragging rights, or for some cool gear?

Well, there is more than that in running a marathon for Leia Guillermo, a counselor in the Student Services department at Coleman University. In January, she completed her 38th marathon in Anaheim at the Disneyland® Star Wars Three Day Marathon. She ran the 5K, 10K, and the half marathon for a total of 23 miles, which is truly impressive! We interviewed Leia about her passion for running and her experience in the marathon community.

How long have you been running in total?

“I started in 2013, so this March will be 4 years.”

What got you started? Do you just love running?

“Well no, actually I hate running! What happened was, when I was 13, I was diagnosed with scoliosis. I had to have surgery to correct it, but before then I was super active and afterwards I was super discouraged. I turned in a lazy bum. Then, one day my friend asked me to join her for a run and I agreed to go, but I kept putting it off. The first 5K that I actually signed up for was an ’80s-them run. I just decided to do it and not care about how fast I could finish it.

Then, I just started joining more and more races. I joined a half marathon on a whim. My first half marathon was for UC San Diego Health. I don’t know how I got addicted to it. I hate running, and you have to get up so early in the morning! But, I think it’s the people I meet that keep me going back. Everyone has an interesting story.”

What is one of your favorite medals that you have ever won?

“Definitely the Star Wars ones. The one from last year was the Kessel Run and the medal was one of the coolest I have seen.”

What is something that you have learned about yourself in becoming a runner?

“You go beyond your own expectations or self-doubts. I discovered I could go beyond what I thought were my limits.”

So, are you a member of any running clubs in San Diego? How do you hear about all of these races?

“I meet people in the community who tell me about races they are planning to run, and I am currently a race ambassador, so I promote different races in San Diego. Through that, I also meet other ambassadors who tell me about races they are working for. This year, I am a race ambassador for the Hot Chocolate run on March 26th in San Diego. It’s a 5K and a 15K.”

Does the theme of these marathon help motivate you to keep going?

“Yeah, it has to be themed. The entry fee for the Disneyland ones are very expensive, but others, like the Rock ‘n’ Roll one in San Diego, are less expensive and still a lot of fun. I like big races; the smaller ones without a theme are not as much fun to me. The first half marathon I ever did was in San Diego and I run it every year because it was my first. It is the only one I run that doesn’t have a theme.”

Do you dress up for these themed runs?

I usually don’t dress up because I just want to get out there and start running. But, this year was the first time I ever dressed up for a race. I wore a Ren costume for the Star Wars Half Marathon. It was hard to run in costume! I am so impressed by all of the costumes I see because I know it’s hard to run wearing extra stuff, so I don’t think I will dress up again.”

So what’s next for you?

“Well, in 3 weeks I am actually going to Disney World® to do the Princess Half Marathon, which is a Beauty and the Beast theme.”

Will you see any celebrities there?

“You do see some celebrities regularly at Disneyland marathons. I see Joey Fatone from NSYNC a lot. Sean Aston (Lord of the Rings) is at almost all of the Disney runs. I also see celebrities from the running community, as well.”

Are there any marathons on your Bucket List?

“Yeah, there’s a marathon at Disneyland Paris. I also want to do to the Boston Marathon®, but you need to qualify for it, so it will have to wait.”

What advice do you have for anyone looking to get into marathon running?

“Sign up for a run you think will be really fun. Once you have made that commitment, it will be more important for you to go and finish it.”

If you are interested in the Hot Chocolate run in San Diego, visit https://www.hotchocolate15k.com/sandiego. Enter SDSWAG2 at checkout for a free visor with your registration.

Coleman encourages all staff and students to engage in health and wellness habits like Leia’s. If there are any marathons you have run and would like to share your success story, send an email to ssanchez@coleman.edu.

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An Interview with Leticia Rabor

Leticia Rabor headshotThe faculty at Coleman is a diverse and interesting community. We have instructors from across the nation, and outside of it, who have a vast array of experiences and knowledge that make our university that much more dynamic. One of the strongest aspects of our faculty community is the continued effort to learn and grow. That desire to learn drove one of our Software Development instructors, Leticia Rabor, to fly to San Francisco for an exciting conference. We sat down with Leticia to discuss her time at the AnDevCon event and get some insight into what is trending in Mobile Development, which is one of the classes that she teaches.

When we asked her what motivated her to go to the conference, Leticia replied “it was beneficial for my personal and professional growth and I learned a lot from the experience”. The AnDevCon is an Android Development Tech Conference that has multiple events throughout the United States and acts as a networking and learning seminar for individuals in the field as well as companies looking to promote their latest developments. Big names like Google, Amazon, and Android Studio were present to meet with developers and showcase their newest creations. According to Leticia there were over 80 workshops being presented that weekend, and all of them were focused on the up and coming tech being created, and the next generation of mobile development for Android. One of the workshops that Leticia attended discussed Proguard in the Android SDK, a Java Optimizer that was led by the original developer/creator himself. According to Leticia there were multiple workshops that were also lead by original developers, such as one that provided an in depth tour of the Gradle Build System.

Leticia Rabor at AnDevCon

One of the best experiences she had was being a part of a “Design Sprint Workshop” presented by Google. Different teams of developers with various backgrounds worked together to create an application that would help match entry level or professional workers with mentors in their career community. The teams had the opportunity to apply the 5 phase framework to accomplish a specific goal. At the end of the workshop the attendees voted on the best designs. The purpose of the Design Sprint Workshop is to gain familiarity with the methods and walk away with a set of tools you can incorporate into your product development process. Leticia plans to bring this type of coding collaboration to her classes to allow students to better prepare for workplace collaboration, communication, and develop their design skills. We also discussed the special events for women in technology that were hosted by the convention. She attended an exclusive luncheon for “Women Who Code” where she was able to meet and network with hundreds of women in the field.

Speaker at AnDevCon

One of the most interesting presentations that she attended was a discussion on the development of Machine Learning at the Google Keynote Seminar. Machine learning is a key evolution in the fields of computer science, data analysis, software engineering, and artificial intelligence. Speakers from around the nation presented the latest advancements in this technology and what may be coming in the near future for this type of programming. One of the biggest takeaways from this experience for Leticia is making sure to encourage students to go to these events. She said “It is really important that students go to these conferences so that they can network and experience this for themselves”. After hearing about all the incredible presentations that were at this conference, it is hard to imagine why someone wouldn’t want to go! The next stop for this conference is Washington D.C.  in 2017. If you are interested in attending this event go to http://www.andevcon.com and sign up for their next conference.

Second speaker at AnDevCon    Presentation at AnDevCon

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Make 2017 the Year to Start or Finish Your Degree

Each year, millions of Americans make New Year’s resolutions and vow to keep them. Eat better! Exercise more! Get organized! While these are all attainable goals, the reality is that many of us lose sight of them within a month or two. Why is it so difficult to keep resolutions? People often become overwhelmed if the goals they set are unrealistic, lacking specific steps to achieve them or both. If starting or completing a college degree is your goal in 2017, here are a few ideas to help keep that goal alive throughout the year.

Take small steps. Once you have chosen the college that meets your needs, schedule an appointment with an admissions representative to get more information. During the meeting, ask about the degree requirements, tuition costs, and potential career opportunities upon graduation. If you were previously enrolled in school, but did not complete your degree, the admissions representative can help determine which credits will transfer, or which additional classes will be needed. Schedule time to speak with the school’s financial aid advisor who can answer questions about financing and using your GI Bill. Does your school hold the Military Friendly® designation? If so, it means that the school has been “recognized for exhibiting leading practices in recruiting and supporting post-military students.”

Create an action plan. Determine what steps you can take today that will have a positive impact on your education. Develop a calendar that includes important dates and deadlines, such as when to register for classes, due dates for midterms and final exams and deadlines for tuition payments. Appoint a close friend, trusted advisor or family member who is willing and able to hold you accountable to your educational plan. Check in with them often to help keep you on track.

Remove distractions. Part of your action plan involves removing distractions, which can prevent us from achieving our goals. Finding a quiet place to study, unplugging from technology, or simply sitting in silence for five minutes and focusing on your present state of mind can help recharge your batteries and drive you forward, rather than backward.

Schedule fun to avoid burnout. Juggling school, work and family is a balancing act. If you find yourself pouring 99% of your time into your studies, be sure to take a break. Meet a friend for lunch, take the kids to the movies or hit the gym to recharge. Your education is an important part of your life as are the people supporting you to reach this goal.

Celebrate! Finally, celebrate your successes along the way. Whether you “aced” a difficult test, finished a complicated class project or met an impossible deadline, don’t wait to pat yourself on the back at the very end. Completing your degree is not only about the end result, but the journey you take along the way.

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Elizabeth Sandoval Named Director of Admissions at Coleman University

Elizabeth Sandoval headshotSAN DIEGO Jan. 23, 2017 – Elizabeth Sandoval has been named director of admissions at Coleman University. Sandoval, a native of Guadalajara, Mexico, has more than 20 years’ experience in the admissions field. Previously she was the director of admissions at IGH School of Nursing.

In her new role, Sandoval is charged with developing a training plan for the admissions team, coaching and overseeing a team of admission representatives, as well as working with both domestic and international students.

“I was an international student from the University of Guadalajara, and I understand the challenges students face when they arrive in the United States,” Sandoval said. “It is our goal to ensure that the enrollment process is seamless for everyone,” said Sandoval.

Sandoval earned a Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc.) in human and business psychology from the University of Guadalajara and continued her studies at the University of Phoenix, focusing on business management.

“We are pleased to have Elizabeth as a valued member of the Coleman team,” said Norbert J. Kubilus, president and CEO of Coleman University. “Her extensive knowledge of the San Diego area and commitment to leading successful admissions will be invaluable as Coleman continues to grow.”

About Coleman University
Coleman University is a private nonprofit teaching university founded in 1963 and located in San Diego, California. Its technology-focused undergraduate and graduate programs prepare individuals for careers and leadership in their chosen fields. As San Diego’s oldest school dedicated to information technology, Coleman University has historically educated a large number of the region’s business-technology professionals.

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Global Game Jam® Returns to Coleman University

Developers and gaming enthusiasts around the world will be participating in this weekend long design/development marathon, from January 20 through the 22nd 2017, and Coleman University will be the only location in San Diego that will be hosting it!  Participants are challenged with creating a working video game  throughout the weekend that follows a theme that will not be revealed until the first day of the event.

Working around the clock and in teams, participants will have to collaborate and simultaneously develop various elements of a game. As if this wasn’t challenging enough, each team is competing with groups in and outside of the U.S. who are working towards the same goal. Though it seems like a difficult challenge, this event is not meant to divide teams. In fact, it is meant to unite teams and create a more connected and collaborative game development community.

The Global Game Jam (GGJ) website says it best:  “The weekend stirs a global creative buzz in games, while at the same time exploring the process of development, be it programming, iterative design, narrative exploration or artistic expression. It is all condensed into a 48 hour development cycle. The GGJ encourages people with all kinds of backgrounds to participate and contribute to this global spread of game development and creativity.” The GGJ will also be broadcast on Twitch so you can follow the action from your mobile device or gaming console.

Coleman has opened this event to any developer, or game enthusiast that wants to participate; that includes graphic designers who are experienced in character design and developing, and software developers who have worked with game coding. The entry fee is $10 and participants must register by January 19th to be eligible to join. The campus will be open for the entire event, and participants will be sleeping and working here at Coleman to finish the challenge.

Last year, we had an impressive number of participants, not just our own students, but many talented developers from around San Diego who wanted to join in as well. Coleman University is the ONLY location in San Diego that will be hosting the GGJ so you don’t want to miss out on this opportunity to meet and work with other game developers in San Diego.

You can visit www.globalgamejam.org or Eventbrite to register, get more information about the challenge, clips and links for past game submissions, an FAQ page, and much more! We hope to see you there!

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