Campus News

Important dates, reminders, and campus information.

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Running is her passion: Leia Guillermo, Student Services, Coleman University

What would it take for you to run 23 miles in three days? Would you do it for money, fame, bragging rights, or for some cool gear?

Well, there is more than that in running a marathon for Leia Guillermo, a counselor in the Student Services department at Coleman University. In January, she completed her 38th marathon in Anaheim at the Disneyland® Star Wars Three Day Marathon. She ran the 5K, 10K, and the half marathon for a total of 23 miles, which is truly impressive! We interviewed Leia about her passion for running and her experience in the marathon community.

How long have you been running in total?

“I started in 2013, so this March will be 4 years.”

What got you started? Do you just love running?

“Well no, actually I hate running! What happened was, when I was 13, I was diagnosed with scoliosis. I had to have surgery to correct it, but before then I was super active and afterwards I was super discouraged. I turned in a lazy bum. Then, one day my friend asked me to join her for a run and I agreed to go, but I kept putting it off. The first 5K that I actually signed up for was an ’80s-them run. I just decided to do it and not care about how fast I could finish it.

Then, I just started joining more and more races. I joined a half marathon on a whim. My first half marathon was for UC San Diego Health. I don’t know how I got addicted to it. I hate running, and you have to get up so early in the morning! But, I think it’s the people I meet that keep me going back. Everyone has an interesting story.”

What is one of your favorite medals that you have ever won?

“Definitely the Star Wars ones. The one from last year was the Kessel Run and the medal was one of the coolest I have seen.”

What is something that you have learned about yourself in becoming a runner?

“You go beyond your own expectations or self-doubts. I discovered I could go beyond what I thought were my limits.”

So, are you a member of any running clubs in San Diego? How do you hear about all of these races?

“I meet people in the community who tell me about races they are planning to run, and I am currently a race ambassador, so I promote different races in San Diego. Through that, I also meet other ambassadors who tell me about races they are working for. This year, I am a race ambassador for the Hot Chocolate run on March 26th in San Diego. It’s a 5K and a 15K.”

Does the theme of these marathon help motivate you to keep going?

“Yeah, it has to be themed. The entry fee for the Disneyland ones are very expensive, but others, like the Rock ‘n’ Roll one in San Diego, are less expensive and still a lot of fun. I like big races; the smaller ones without a theme are not as much fun to me. The first half marathon I ever did was in San Diego and I run it every year because it was my first. It is the only one I run that doesn’t have a theme.”

Do you dress up for these themed runs?

I usually don’t dress up because I just want to get out there and start running. But, this year was the first time I ever dressed up for a race. I wore a Ren costume for the Star Wars Half Marathon. It was hard to run in costume! I am so impressed by all of the costumes I see because I know it’s hard to run wearing extra stuff, so I don’t think I will dress up again.”

So what’s next for you?

“Well, in 3 weeks I am actually going to Disney World® to do the Princess Half Marathon, which is a Beauty and the Beast theme.”

Will you see any celebrities there?

“You do see some celebrities regularly at Disneyland marathons. I see Joey Fatone from NSYNC a lot. Sean Aston (Lord of the Rings) is at almost all of the Disney runs. I also see celebrities from the running community, as well.”

Are there any marathons on your Bucket List?

“Yeah, there’s a marathon at Disneyland Paris. I also want to do to the Boston Marathon®, but you need to qualify for it, so it will have to wait.”

What advice do you have for anyone looking to get into marathon running?

“Sign up for a run you think will be really fun. Once you have made that commitment, it will be more important for you to go and finish it.”

If you are interested in the Hot Chocolate run in San Diego, visit https://www.hotchocolate15k.com/sandiego. Enter SDSWAG2 at checkout for a free visor with your registration.

Coleman encourages all staff and students to engage in health and wellness habits like Leia’s. If there are any marathons you have run and would like to share your success story, send an email to ssanchez@coleman.edu.

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An Interview with Leticia Rabor

Leticia Rabor headshotThe faculty at Coleman is a diverse and interesting community. We have instructors from across the nation, and outside of it, who have a vast array of experiences and knowledge that make our university that much more dynamic. One of the strongest aspects of our faculty community is the continued effort to learn and grow. That desire to learn drove one of our Software Development instructors, Leticia Rabor, to fly to San Francisco for an exciting conference. We sat down with Leticia to discuss her time at the AnDevCon event and get some insight into what is trending in Mobile Development, which is one of the classes that she teaches.

When we asked her what motivated her to go to the conference, Leticia replied “it was beneficial for my personal and professional growth and I learned a lot from the experience”. The AnDevCon is an Android Development Tech Conference that has multiple events throughout the United States and acts as a networking and learning seminar for individuals in the field as well as companies looking to promote their latest developments. Big names like Google, Amazon, and Android Studio were present to meet with developers and showcase their newest creations. According to Leticia there were over 80 workshops being presented that weekend, and all of them were focused on the up and coming tech being created, and the next generation of mobile development for Android. One of the workshops that Leticia attended discussed Proguard in the Android SDK, a Java Optimizer that was led by the original developer/creator himself. According to Leticia there were multiple workshops that were also lead by original developers, such as one that provided an in depth tour of the Gradle Build System.

Leticia Rabor at AnDevCon

One of the best experiences she had was being a part of a “Design Sprint Workshop” presented by Google. Different teams of developers with various backgrounds worked together to create an application that would help match entry level or professional workers with mentors in their career community. The teams had the opportunity to apply the 5 phase framework to accomplish a specific goal. At the end of the workshop the attendees voted on the best designs. The purpose of the Design Sprint Workshop is to gain familiarity with the methods and walk away with a set of tools you can incorporate into your product development process. Leticia plans to bring this type of coding collaboration to her classes to allow students to better prepare for workplace collaboration, communication, and develop their design skills. We also discussed the special events for women in technology that were hosted by the convention. She attended an exclusive luncheon for “Women Who Code” where she was able to meet and network with hundreds of women in the field.

Speaker at AnDevCon

One of the most interesting presentations that she attended was a discussion on the development of Machine Learning at the Google Keynote Seminar. Machine learning is a key evolution in the fields of computer science, data analysis, software engineering, and artificial intelligence. Speakers from around the nation presented the latest advancements in this technology and what may be coming in the near future for this type of programming. One of the biggest takeaways from this experience for Leticia is making sure to encourage students to go to these events. She said “It is really important that students go to these conferences so that they can network and experience this for themselves”. After hearing about all the incredible presentations that were at this conference, it is hard to imagine why someone wouldn’t want to go! The next stop for this conference is Washington D.C.  in 2017. If you are interested in attending this event go to http://www.andevcon.com and sign up for their next conference.

Second speaker at AnDevCon    Presentation at AnDevCon

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Make 2017 the Year to Start or Finish Your Degree

Each year, millions of Americans make New Year’s resolutions and vow to keep them. Eat better! Exercise more! Get organized! While these are all attainable goals, the reality is that many of us lose sight of them within a month or two. Why is it so difficult to keep resolutions? People often become overwhelmed if the goals they set are unrealistic, lacking specific steps to achieve them or both. If starting or completing a college degree is your goal in 2017, here are a few ideas to help keep that goal alive throughout the year.

Take small steps. Once you have chosen the college that meets your needs, schedule an appointment with an admissions representative to get more information. During the meeting, ask about the degree requirements, tuition costs, and potential career opportunities upon graduation. If you were previously enrolled in school, but did not complete your degree, the admissions representative can help determine which credits will transfer, or which additional classes will be needed. Schedule time to speak with the school’s financial aid advisor who can answer questions about financing and using your GI Bill. Does your school hold the Military Friendly® designation? If so, it means that the school has been “recognized for exhibiting leading practices in recruiting and supporting post-military students.”

Create an action plan. Determine what steps you can take today that will have a positive impact on your education. Develop a calendar that includes important dates and deadlines, such as when to register for classes, due dates for midterms and final exams and deadlines for tuition payments. Appoint a close friend, trusted advisor or family member who is willing and able to hold you accountable to your educational plan. Check in with them often to help keep you on track.

Remove distractions. Part of your action plan involves removing distractions, which can prevent us from achieving our goals. Finding a quiet place to study, unplugging from technology, or simply sitting in silence for five minutes and focusing on your present state of mind can help recharge your batteries and drive you forward, rather than backward.

Schedule fun to avoid burnout. Juggling school, work and family is a balancing act. If you find yourself pouring 99% of your time into your studies, be sure to take a break. Meet a friend for lunch, take the kids to the movies or hit the gym to recharge. Your education is an important part of your life as are the people supporting you to reach this goal.

Celebrate! Finally, celebrate your successes along the way. Whether you “aced” a difficult test, finished a complicated class project or met an impossible deadline, don’t wait to pat yourself on the back at the very end. Completing your degree is not only about the end result, but the journey you take along the way.

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Elizabeth Sandoval Named Director of Admissions at Coleman University

Elizabeth Sandoval headshotSAN DIEGO Jan. 23, 2017 – Elizabeth Sandoval has been named director of admissions at Coleman University. Sandoval, a native of Guadalajara, Mexico, has more than 20 years’ experience in the admissions field. Previously she was the director of admissions at IGH School of Nursing.

In her new role, Sandoval is charged with developing a training plan for the admissions team, coaching and overseeing a team of admission representatives, as well as working with both domestic and international students.

“I was an international student from the University of Guadalajara, and I understand the challenges students face when they arrive in the United States,” Sandoval said. “It is our goal to ensure that the enrollment process is seamless for everyone,” said Sandoval.

Sandoval earned a Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc.) in human and business psychology from the University of Guadalajara and continued her studies at the University of Phoenix, focusing on business management.

“We are pleased to have Elizabeth as a valued member of the Coleman team,” said Norbert J. Kubilus, president and CEO of Coleman University. “Her extensive knowledge of the San Diego area and commitment to leading successful admissions will be invaluable as Coleman continues to grow.”

About Coleman University
Coleman University is a private nonprofit teaching university founded in 1963 and located in San Diego, California. Its technology-focused undergraduate and graduate programs prepare individuals for careers and leadership in their chosen fields. As San Diego’s oldest school dedicated to information technology, Coleman University has historically educated a large number of the region’s business-technology professionals.

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Global Game Jam® Returns to Coleman University

Developers and gaming enthusiasts around the world will be participating in this weekend long design/development marathon, from January 20 through the 22nd 2017, and Coleman University will be the only location in San Diego that will be hosting it!  Participants are challenged with creating a working video game  throughout the weekend that follows a theme that will not be revealed until the first day of the event.

Working around the clock and in teams, participants will have to collaborate and simultaneously develop various elements of a game. As if this wasn’t challenging enough, each team is competing with groups in and outside of the U.S. who are working towards the same goal. Though it seems like a difficult challenge, this event is not meant to divide teams. In fact, it is meant to unite teams and create a more connected and collaborative game development community.

The Global Game Jam (GGJ) website says it best:  “The weekend stirs a global creative buzz in games, while at the same time exploring the process of development, be it programming, iterative design, narrative exploration or artistic expression. It is all condensed into a 48 hour development cycle. The GGJ encourages people with all kinds of backgrounds to participate and contribute to this global spread of game development and creativity.” The GGJ will also be broadcast on Twitch so you can follow the action from your mobile device or gaming console.

Coleman has opened this event to any developer, or game enthusiast that wants to participate; that includes graphic designers who are experienced in character design and developing, and software developers who have worked with game coding. The entry fee is $10 and participants must register by January 19th to be eligible to join. The campus will be open for the entire event, and participants will be sleeping and working here at Coleman to finish the challenge.

Last year, we had an impressive number of participants, not just our own students, but many talented developers from around San Diego who wanted to join in as well. Coleman University is the ONLY location in San Diego that will be hosting the GGJ so you don’t want to miss out on this opportunity to meet and work with other game developers in San Diego.

You can visit www.globalgamejam.org or Eventbrite to register, get more information about the challenge, clips and links for past game submissions, an FAQ page, and much more! We hope to see you there!

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An Interview with Travis Vasquez, Instructor, Game Programming Development and Design

Global Game Jam® (GGJ) has become a fast-growing event at Coleman University. For the past two years, we have hosted this event to help bring together gamers, artists, and developers from around San Diego to prove just how much talent lives in this city. The dates for the 2017 GGJ are January 20-22, so we sat down with one of our own Game Programming Development and Design instructors, Travis Vasquez, to talk about the importance of this event and the benefits to participants.

How long have you been working with the Global Game Jam?

“Coleman University and the San Diego IGDA started working together in May of 2015 and three months later we held our first GGJ in August on the campus. With the success of that event, we decided to continue holding IGDA events at Coleman University. Since 2015, we have held Game Jam events twice a year.”

What are the benefits, immediate and otherwise, for participants?

“The main benefit is networking with fellow developers and industry veterans. This event will get you out of your comfort zone and break free from your shell to collaborate, brainstorm, and have fun.”

Do you have any favorite games that have come out of this challenge over the years?

“I don’t necessarily have a favorite game, but I do have a favorite experience. Last year’s event was the first time where VR (virtual reality) was available for participants to work with. Jeep Barnett from Valve was kind enough to come down for the weekend to attend the GGJ at Coleman University and offer the use of two Dev HTC Vives for participants to develop on. I remember one team decided to create a game in VR where the player was on a row boat and with the two controllers in hand, the player had to figure out how to move the boat across the water and through various obstacles, going forward, backward, right, and left. It was really great to see this new technology being used by our students.”

How do you sign up to participate in this event?

“Anyone who is interested can join in. The cost is $10 and includes a free lunch. Registration ends on January 19. Visit Eventbrite to register and for more information.”

What do you recommend that people bring with them for this challenge?

“Participants should bring their own equipment, especially items that they are used to working with (i.e. computers, laptops, monitors, headphones, Wacom tablets, etc). We also suggest including water, snacks, sleeping bags and a pillow, if you plan on staying for the full weekend. Basically, bring what you need to be comfortable for two days.”

How have you been preparing Coleman students for this event?

“We have other participants (Coleman students) that come into the classrooms and talk about their past Game Jam experience. Faculty discuss with students what to expect when they arrive, how the process works, and the importance of networking with other participants.”

Will you be showcasing the final product after the event is over?

“Just like last year, IGDA will host all the submitted/completed games on their website, which can be accessed at any time after the event is over. Many of the 2016 Global Game Jam projects are available to play on the IGDA site. If you are interested in attending the event and working with local game developers, please feel free to join in!”

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5 facts about graphic design that will help boost your career

A career in graphic design seems to revolve around visual concepts, computer software and aesthetics trends. However, to build a successful journey as a graphic designer, you must learn much more than that. It’s crucial to acquire general knowledge about multiple topics.

At Coleman University, our Graphic Design Program provides the foundation you will need to start your career. You will learn the basics of drawing, design principles, the latest in design software, typography and vector graphics, for example. Our coursework will provide you with a well-rounded instruction that will prepare you for every challenge you will find once you enter the workforce.

You will learn those skills from seasoned instructors who have years of experience working in the graphic design field. They will share with you and your colleagues tips that will help you prepare for job interviews and, most important, for the job itself.

Here we list five facts about graphic design that will help you to understand more about the field and start your career with the right foot.

  1. Multiple career options are available

As a graphic designer, you will have multiple career options in a variety of settings, such as advertising agencies, publishing houses, marketing agencies and service industries. Designers create compelling visual concepts to communicate an advertising or informational message. Usually, people think the only way to go is to have the “graphic designer” job title. However, there are many ways to specialize and choose the career path you want to take based on your preferences and talents.

Technology is always changing, which directly affects the graphic design industry. To succeed, professionals must be aware of all the new trends, software and opportunities. Learning all the possibilities available will also present you with specialized paths that can give you financial stability and the chance to earn more money.

Some of the careers you can choose with a graphic design degree are:

  • Art Director
  • Creative Director
  • Film and Video Editor
  • Industrial/Product Designer
  • Package Designer
  • Web Designer
  • Marketing Manager or Specialist
  • Multimedia Artist
  • Software Quality Assurance Tester
  • Animator
  • Software Application Developer

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job prospects for graphic designers will continue growing for the upcoming years. In 2014, one in five graphic designers was self-employed, which shows the array of opportunities graphic designers have for their journey in the job market. Even though the job competition might be hard, there will always be openings for talented designers who are trained with the latest technologies and excellent instruction.

At Coleman University, you will find just that. Coleman’s inverted curriculum allows you to learn everything you need to tackle real-life projects during the first months of your program, preparing you to enter the job market quickly and launch your new career.

  1. Portfolios are important

Employers and clients expect to see a strong portfolio when they are looking to hire a graphic designer. A well-crafted portfolio that showcases your work and style will make a statement, and possibly guarantee you that job you always wanted.

An online portfolio is easy to build and to visit. It’s a link that you can add to your resume and will actually attest that you can do the job. The client will understand your capacity and your style, and that can even make your job easier. You will both be on the same page and well aware of what to expect.

At Coleman University, you will have a Portfolio course as part of the Graphic Design Program. This “capstone” course is the culmination of students’ associate-level design coursework. Core concepts include presenting a finished body of work in a professional context. Topics covered include designing a resume, assembling digital and print portfolios, creating “leave behinds” and learning how to best represent your skills, abilities and knowledge to gain employment in the profession.

During your studies at Coleman University, you will be able to start crafting your portfolio with hands-on projects you will work in class.

  1. Graphic designers create for clients

Remember that graphic design is a very client-oriented career. All your work will involve what the client is expecting and needing for that particular campaign. You will probably develop your signature style (which will be present in everything you do), but the client’s directions are the main guidelines for your project. You will have to understand and address the client’s requirements in order to complete the job.

Communication is very important in client-oriented jobs, which is why you must work on your communication skills. You must be able to understand what your client wants, ask questions that can improve results and avoid misunderstandings, and manage your client’s expectations about deadlines and outcomes.

Clients pay for a job that they want to see delivered. You can and must provide artistic design options for them, but sometimes this is not what they are looking for. So the graphic designer must be able to understand and follow directions. Some designers say that this is the hardest part of the job: learning that solving problems to please the client is often more important than designing a very artistic work..

At Coleman University, your classes will cover communication and professional practices that will help you develop the soft skills you need to successfully communicate with clients. Here are some examples:

DSN274 Professional Practices: This course explores standards and practices in the graphic design profession. Emphasis is placed on communication, professional relationships and the economic interests of designers. Topics covered include pricing structures, copyright protection, ethical guidelines, contracts and forms, project schedules and business taxes.

ENG200 Communications GE: Communications is designed to introduce students to the theory and use of human and public communication. Various types of communication studied include the following: perception, listening, verbal, nonverbal, interpersonal, intercultural.

  1. You must be a good writer

When you are a good writer, you are able to express yourself and communicate well. Being a graphic designer might appear to require only aesthetic and technical skills, but don’t be misled. To really succeed in this field, you must know how to write in a way that you can be completely understood when explaining ideas and projects.

Not only should your grammar be good, but your comprehension and interpretation should be exceptional as well. You will be working with clients with different backgrounds and cultures, and you will need to understand and be understood.

Occasionally, you will be required to write copy for your designs. So be prepared to show your skills and surprise your clients with strong and inspirational copy.

As part of the Graphic Design Program at Coleman, you will take part in College Composition, a course that will help you improve your writing skills. The course gives you instruction in the theory and guidelines of composition for college writing with an emphasis on the following: grammar review, rhetorical strategies, essay writing, collaborative writing and academic writing.

  1. Develop and exploit other skills that might be helpful

Let’s say you love photography. This might be the time to incorporate all your knowledge from this subject into your work as a graphic designer.

Remember that every experience you collect during your lifetime can help you to create your style and improve the work you are doing. Bring the knowledge you have about other subjects to your career. You might love to write, or really enjoy video games. This all can help. If you have a deep understanding about art or pop culture, it can help your designs to have more sophistication or target the right audience.

One skill that every graphic designer should learn and develop is presentation. The power of a good presentation can catch the client’s eyes (or your director’s eyes) and generate great opportunities. You must master the art of presenting your work, adapting to each audience in order to get the best results.

Learn the best color choices, strategies and font selections to state your presence as a professional. Always put yourself in the client’s shoes. They will expect a good presentation from someone who works with aesthetics, so don’t disappoint them.

Since graphic design is an aesthetic-oriented career, prospects usually think that they should learn only about visuals, image editing and design to be an excellent designer. Don’t make that mistake. Be advised that to really succeed as a respected graphic designer, you will have to master a number of different skills that will improve the quality of your work and the perception your clients will have from it.

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Coleman University Program Director Mentors High School Team for CS Championship

With the first two qualification rounds behind them, two teams from SET (School for Entrepreneurship and Technology ) Charter High School in San Diego are gearing up to participate in the CyberPatriot National Youth Cyber Defense Competition State Round, beginning January 15, 2017.

CyberPatriot is the National Youth Cyber Education Program conceived by the Airforce Association to inspire students to work towards achieving a degree in Cybersecurity, as well as focusing on building a career in the field.

This exacting competition provides high school and middle school teams (in separate competitions) with operating system virtual images for which they are tasked with not only finding vulnerabilities, but also hardening the systems themselves. This competition will simulate a real world experience of being an IT professional running the network for a small company. The SET Charter High School students have worked hard to reach this milestone in their CyberSecurity skill development and this event is a great opportunity to show off what they have learned. The winning teams of this round, and the Regional Championships, will be given an all-expenses paid trip to Baltimore Maryland for the National Finals Competition, where they will be competing for scholarships and national recognition.

The two teams from SET are being mentored and monitored by Bill Reid, LCDR USN (Ret) the Program Director for Cybersecurity and Software Development at Coleman University.

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Software Development student creates program to simplify search for textbooks

Starting a new semester is rarely a smooth process. From creating a workable class schedule to locating your new classrooms, the transition to a new semester often brings stress and confusion for students. However, a new application developed by a Coleman University student will alleviate one of the most problematic issues that students face at the beginning of each new semester. Ryan Jones, a student in the Software Development program, recently developed an application that will help students find the correct versions of their textbooks for each of their classes. Using JavaScript, JSON, jQuery, and Bootstrap Framework (HTML and CSS), Ryan was able to create an innovative Single Page Application. After bringing the idea to the administration at Coleman University, Ryan met with the IT department to discuss the ins and outs of the application. From there it did not take long before the application was live and linked to the Coleman University website for student use.

With new editions of textbooks printed nearly every year, students often fall into the trap of buying an outdated copy. To combat this, Ryan designed his application to display a list of required textbooks when the user enters the course ID. He used the individual ISBN numbers for almost all of the required textbooks at Coleman to build the repository of pictures and information for each book. This ensures that students are buying the correct versions rather than having to search physical shelves or a seemingly endless online database of past editions. Even more conveniently, the application has a link built in to compare process online across multiple websites. With the rising cost of college textbooks, Ryan’s application helps students find the best deal possible with the click of a mouse. Ryan’s application can be found at http://coleman.edu/bookfinder/index.html.

When asked about his motivation for creating this application, Ryan said that he saw a need and tried to fill it. With the software development industry’s focus on candidates with real life experience, Ryan’s initiative in addressing an issue in his own life that he saw as problematic will serve him well in his career. He plans to take this application framework and develop his own Japanese to English dictionary in the future.

Bookfinder desktop photo

Bookfinder desktop search photo

Bookfinder mobile search photo

Bookfinder mobile homepage photo

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Overview of Graphic Design at Coleman University

Graphic designers are storytellers. And storytelling is getting a lot of attention in the marketing industry right now. At Coleman University students will learn how to understand the client’s needs and what the targeting audience is looking for, and with that they will be able to develop content that addresses those intentions. From websites to business cards, the graphic designer will create the graphics and tell a story through all the channels. To succeed in this field, graphic designers must have a deep understanding of branding concepts, computer skills, art and pop culture.

The Graphic Design Program at Coleman University provides students the opportunity to learn the art of visual communication and all its facets from industry professionals and knowledgeable designers with years of field experience. Classes are built around professional practices and incorporate actual production processes from draft sketches to finished digital portfolio.  You will learn how traditional practices and digital publishing tools are interwoven into meaningful visual hierarchies to convey specific messages to target audiences. Content development skills honed include photography and image manipulation, vector art, digital publishing, and web skills including HTML, CSS, and content management systems. All of which will equip you with the necessary training to easily produce quality digital content for a multimedia advertising campaign or for your own portfolio.

If you are creative, love art and dream about becoming a graphic designer, Coleman University has the perfect program for you.

What You Can Do With Your Design Degree

Choosing a career in graphic design means you can choose to work in multiple kinds of occupations, such as:

  • Graphic Designer
  • Production Artist
  • Art Director
  • Creative Director
  • Illustrator
  • Package Designer
  • Digital Printing Specialist

The opportunities are vast. The way you choose to go depends on your personal preferences. For example, if you would like to work with something artistic, you can be a creative director and help companies with their marketing campaigns. For that, you must have a good eye for aesthetics, be able to identify trends and interpret a brand voice, translating an idea to graphics that will catch the customer’s eyes.

Companies from a variety of fields need the work of a skilled graphic designer. You will be able to find job placement with marketing agencies, publishing companies, and advertisers, and even be a freelancer or self-employed designer. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014 one in five graphic designers was self-employed.

At Coleman University the inverted curriculum allows you to enter the job market quickly. You will learn everything you need to tackle real-life projects during the first portion of your program, allowing you to start your career in a matter of months.

Opportunities for Designers in the Field

The job outlook for graphic designers will be very stable in the coming years. According to O*Net OnLine, it is projected that almost 66,000 more jobs will be created by 2024.

There is a lot of competition for graphic designers. These professionals must keep up to date with new software being released, engagement strategies and current trends in design. All of this requires good instruction that will strengthen your skills and train you for the challenges you will encounter when working on real-life design projects.

At Coleman University, you will find excellent instruction and cutting-edge facilities that will provide you with everything you need to enter the job market and successfully face the competition.

Program Features

In Coleman’s Graphic Design Program you will learn multiple sets of skills necessary to start a career as a respected designer. From typography to branding, our classes will equip you to get the job you dream about or start your new business.

Classes are designed to teach you the most current information and software being used by industry experts. And at the end of your coursework you will have a capstone course that will be the culmination of your associate-level design degree, in which you will present a finished body of design work in a professional context. Topics covered in this course include crafting a resume and putting together digital and print portfolios.

Some of the program’s main features include:

  • Exploring design principles, digital imagery, the web and multimedia, vector graphics and typography.
  • Studying design principles in the context of commercial application.
  • Creating design projects that are anchored to job specifications within a standard industry workflow.
  • Gaining knowledge of marketing for designers (branding) and graphic arts techniques.
  • Designing advertising layouts, web banner ads, brochures and logos.
  • Learning in a hands-on, project-based environment that reflects real-world scenarios.

If you are curious about what courses you will take and what subjects you will cover in the Graphic Design Program, check the list below for a glimpse:

DSN 104 Drawing: This course provides direct experience in a variety of drawing techniques to sharpen perception, stimulate imagination and increase the ability to see and interpret the world in design. Core concepts include techniques to accelerate the creative process, and improving drawing skills to be competitive in the design industry. Topics covered include composition, single and multiple point perspectives, gestural and contour drawing, quick sketching, line, shape, color, value, and form.

DSN 114 Design Principles: This course provides an opportunity to apply basic drawing skills and brainstorming techniques to generate a variety of design ideas and solutions. Core concepts include the recognition and application of design elements and principles to construct balanced, organized compositions and employing drawing skills in the creative process as part of a typical professional workflow. Topics covered include drawing techniques, design principles, composition of type, and how to create meaningful designs.

COM 124 Computer Foundations: This entry-level technical course ensures basic computer competency with an emphasis on software used by design professionals. Core concepts include file management, selecting the right tools for the right job, and effectively managing workflows. Topics covered include operating platforms, network basics, office productivity software and design software.

DSN 134 Typography: This course presents an overview of design principles as they pertain to the use of type in graphic design. Core concepts include challenging students to consider what a glyph or letterform is communicating on both unconscious and visual levels in order to produce typography that effectively communicates intended marketing messages. Topics covered include the history, anatomy, terminology, and application of typography.

DSN 144 Photography: This course provides experience in commercial digital photography. Core concepts include understanding the physical, conceptual, and theoretical characteristics of digital photography, and the development of digital photography skills in producing expressive and thoughtful original images for design projects. Topics covered include framing, composition, the “rule of thirds,” light, texture, pattern, line, symmetry, depth of field, distance, perspective, culture, space, and balance.

COM 154 Vector Graphics: This course provides an opportunity to create original vector art, and to understand the important role of vector graphics in modern graphic design. Core concepts include essential methodologies in the production of professional artwork, and developing skills with various tools and techniques for outputting high-quality print and web graphics. Topics covered include rendering techniques, file organization, output formats, digitizing organic artwork, Bézier curves, colorizing, and special effects.

DSN 184 Marketing: This course introduces marketing, with an emphasis on the designer’s role in marketing activities. Core concepts include identifying target markets and determining creative approaches to delivering specific marketing messages to consumers. Topics covered include analyzing and developing advertisements through the creative process, and exploring the relationship between graphic design and consumer behavior.

Our program also covers general subjects that are important for a graphic designer, such as communications, security and ethics, policies and procedures. To learn about the full class schedule, you can check the complete list on Coleman’s website.

Small Class Size

To create a learning atmosphere that is interactive and dynamic, it is important to have classes with a small number of students. That is the best way to increase participation in discussions and projects, and also to elevate the level of the debate.

At Coleman University, each class in your academic program will keep the number of students low and participation high, allowing you to actively participate in hands-on projects and get the most out of every class.

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