Celebrate National Trivia Day with Coleman University!

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January 4th is National Trivia Day and we want to share some fun facts about us! As you know, Coleman University was established here in San Diego in 1963 by Dr. Coleman and Mrs. Lois Furr. Our first building was in Downtown San Diego, and since our first graduating class; we have been making history in this amazing city. Check out our list of some of the top 10 most interesting trivia facts about Coleman University, and if you’re an alumnus, feel free to share your own trivia in the comments!

  1. Coleman’s original mainframe was named Kermit; the name was changed to Papa Bear in the 1990’s.
  2. Coleman University (then Coleman College) presented its first lecture about the internet and the World Wide Web in 1991. The internet was not even being accessed commercially at this point by users at home; that came later in 1995.
  3. In the 1990s Coleman was the home of the Computer Museum of America, whose mission was to collect, preserve, and exhibit historic computer equipment and artifacts.
  4. Coleman (then the Automation Institute) conferred the first degree in Data Processing issued by a private data processing institution in the state of California in 1963. The degree was conferred to Jean Thomas by Doctor Coleman Furr, our co-founder.
  5. Our second location was in Old Town San Diego, at 2425 San Diego Avenue. Today that location is now a storefront; you might not even recognize it with all of the changes!
  6. Over the years Coleman has had a successful track team and softball team that competed in events across San Diego.
  7. Our Co-founder, Dr. Coleman Furr, was a friend of Grace Hopper (the inventor of modern binary code for programming) and since the founding of our institution Coleman has always dedicated a hall on our campus in her name.
  8. From 1974-1976, Coleman College supplied 38-42% of all the initial Data Processing workers needed during the early days of building mainframes to begin automating City and County Government offices in San Diego.
  9. On September 12, 2015 the White House, through their “College Scorecard” software named Coleman University as a school whose students graduate on time, get good jobs and can pay off their loans quickly.
  10. On Jan 26, 2017 – Coleman University became host to “Hornet’s Nest,” San Diego’s first publically-available Indoor UAV drone flight, test, and training facility. It is open 11AM-2PM every Saturday in the B Building located on the West side of the campus.

Since 1963, it has been the philosophy of the Automation Institute, Coleman College, and Coleman University to bring career opportunities and accessible education to any and all people who wanted to learn. Technology was a passion for our founder, and that passion is still here today. We can’t wait to see what history we continue to make here at Coleman and in San Diego!

 

If you are interested in taking your own passion for technology and turning it into a career, call us today at (858) 499-0202 and we would be happy to give you a tour! (Tours are available in Spanish).

Become a part of our history, and look to your own future, at Coleman University!

Coleman University Technology Focused Careers

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Faculty Spotlight: Ben Mead

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This month we sat down with an instructor from our Software Development Department, Ben Mead for an interview about his life in technology and his passions. From his early interest in technology, to his current role as an instructor at Coleman University, there is a lot to know about Ben! Read on to find out something new about one of your favorite instructors on our campus.

Have you always lived in San Diego? What was it like growing up in Southern California?

While at this point I’ve been in San Diego for most of my life, I can still wear shorts year round and sometimes find myself longing for a snow day. Nevertheless, this is the city I love and call home.

What was the first experience that you had with technology that inspired you to make it your career?

Growing up on Oregon Trail and the NES showed me there is a lot of fun to be had with electronics. However, it wasn’t until middle school during a Basic Apple class where I thought, “this is what I want to spend my time doing.” I thought it was so cool to write a program that could create a simple pixel police car and make it drive across the screen blinking its light along the way. I was instantly hooked on computers, as they provided me the satisfaction and feedback I needed as a young teen. It did what I what I asked it to do. It also let me know real quickly when I made a mistake, without judgment, and I could then fix it.

What is one of your favorite subjects to teach in your classes?

As a technologist by trade, I am able to bring an experienced perspective, from working in the industry, to my students. One of the benefits of teaching in the Cybersecurity program at Coleman University is that I get to relate each of the classes I teach to current event examples of how criminals and law enforcement are leveraging technology to work through their operational challenges. Additionally, I enjoy creating open forum conversations with each class as they work through team dynamics and coordinated obstacles, so that together they are able to produce an outcome greater than they would individually.

How do you think TV and other media have changed the way that people think about technology and hacking?

Hollywood and the media are hilarious with the way they portray technology and those who use it! They portray outrageous and beyond reasonable examples, ranging from exploding monitors in soap operas to typing the word “cookie” to stop a cookie monster virus. More often than not, the overdramatic misinformation takes away from the beauty of modern technology and the terrifying reality of what is happening in the hacking scene today.

Do you have one type of tech that you can’t live without in your daily life?

Convenience is a key reason anyone adopts a technology. I find myself pretty resourceful but my go-to convenience for work and play has got to be my smartphone. It grants me the ability to terminal in from anywhere and check out the latest cat gif (pronounced like a gift and not like the peanut butter JIF).

What activities or hobbies do you like that have as little to do with tech as possible?

The least tech hobby I’ve got is playing paintball. It’s just so satisfying laying rope down a lane and watching someone run right through it!

How long have you been teaching at Coleman? What’s your favorite class to teach?

The last two years teaching at Coleman have been a fun and enriching experience. It’s hard to pick one class that I’ve enjoyed the best, as each of them has been awesome in their own way.

Do you have any resources, like books or websites, that you recommend for good information about coding and programming?

I recommend that anyone looking for more information on learning coding and programming should talk to one of our Admissions Consultants about what they’re looking to accomplish and how Coleman University can help.

 

 

 

If you are interested in learning about all that you can accomplish with a degree in technology, call us today to set up an appointment with one of our admissions representatives at (858) 499-0202. We are here Monday through Friday to answer all of your questions and help you get started on the path to a lifelong career in technology!

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Celebrate International Internet Day!

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      What do you consider to be the greatest invention in modern history? Many will suggest the automobile, airplanes, the telephone, or even sliced bread, but there’s one that we think outshines them all. Yes, we are talking about the internet! The internet has created a powerful online community that has spawned countless cultural changes and has greatly influenced our lives. Through social media and email alone we have the ability to instantly connect with our friends and family, as well as new acquaintances from around the world. It is hard to fathom that this invention is technically a new phenomenon; we’ve only had the modern internet since 1989!

Why do we celebrate internet Day on October 29th? On this date in 1969, the first recorded message transmission was sent over an internet connection between two computers. A student at UCLA named Charley Kline attempted to send log in information to another student at Stanford named Bill Duvall and managed to send the letters “L” and “O” before the connection was lost. At the time these two students were working on the ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) which was being funded by the US Department of Defense and consisted of four terminals set up at UCLA, Stanford, UC Santa Barbara, and the University of Utah. Each terminal operated independently testing various connections and after this first message attempt, it only took an hour to send the entire message to Stanford.

Even though this internet connection was the birth of the World Wide Web, it was still uncommon for anyone outside of universities, government agencies, and a few scientific labs to be using it at this time. This year also marked the establishment of HTML and HTTP by Tim Berners-Lee who was working in Britain at CERN. The World Wide Web was officially launched as a project in August of 1991 and you can see the results of that project today when you pick up your smartphone. The digital age in the late 90s and into the early 2000s was an explosion of internet fever with over 162 million new and public websites being created and hosted online. Silicon Valley in Northern California became the epicenter of internet development and the dotcom boom. Today the internet is a central pillar in global communications and almost every notable public figure has their own profile online that their fans can interact with. How much do you use the internet in your daily life?

It is important to note that Coleman University was established in 1963, long before the internet was born. Computers were not developed for internet use, in fact, they were initially conceptualized for computing large sums (hence the name “computer”) and storing information securely. At the time it would have been unheard of to discuss putting a computer into a private home. Why would a family or single person need one? It may be hard to imagine now, but considering the size of the computers that were being built, it would have been hard to fit one inside of a home in the first place!

We recognize Internet Day as a moment to reflect on the incredible advancements in technology that we have witnessed in the past century and will continue to see in the future. Celebrate today by learning more about the history of the internet, how it has influenced your life, and the telling your friends on social media to celebrate too!

If you are interested in learning more about our degrees in Software Development, Cybersecurity, and Game Design call us at (858) 499-0202 and schedule a tour! There are thousands of jobs for programmers and coders across the nation, and we want to help you get started in your dream career today!

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The History of Hispanic Heritage Month

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From September 15th to October 15th, we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States. The impact of Hispanic settlers, inventors, actors, scientists, authors, etc. in our country reaches farther than you may know, and we want to give them the credit that they deserve. This acknowledgment started in 1968 as a week-long event, at the proclamation of President Lyndon B. Johnson, and was eventually expanded to a 30-day period through legislation implemented by President Roland Reagan. This time of year is a celebration of the history and accomplishments of the Hispanic community, and there are many to celebrate!

Hispanic culture is not just focused on Spanish history and cultural impact. Hispanic Heritage Month includes the indigenous peoples and cultures of North and South America (such as the Arawaks, Aztecs, Incas, and Maya, as well as some African cultures). The roots of Hispanic culture reach far across the globe. The start of Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15th, was chosen because it marks the date of independence for five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Other countries such as Belize, Chile, and Mexico celebrate their own independence days during this period. According to the recent government census, around 17% of the population in the United States is of Hispanic or Latino origin (that means 57.5 million people!). Think of all of the cultures that that number includes!

Our home state of California has a long Hispanic heritage that goes back centuries and can still be seen and felt throughout our state. When North America was being settled by the Spanish in the 1500s, Juan Cabrillo made landfall in what would become San Diego harbor in 1542. At the time, almost all of the west coast of North America was a part of Mexico, but was yet largely unexplored, except for the catholic missions that had been built as religious settlements. Today many of those missions have become museums chronicling this history for visitors who want to experience life as a Spanish settler. There are plenty of opportunities to experience Hispanic history in San Diego during heritage month and plenty of things to learn about Hispanic culture in North America. Why not attend the San Diego County Latino Association – Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration on October 23rd, or the 2017 Unity Conference presented by the Latino School Boards Association on October 5th? You can also visit the official website for Hispanic Heritage Month to see all of the events being held across the United States in honor of this event. Locally we have events being held in Old Town San Diego and downtown such as food tastings, film festivals, and special lectures. You do not have to be of Hispanic origin to enjoy Hispanic Heritage Month and participate in all of the fun events. Learning about another culture through participation is a great way to better understand Hispanic history and learn something new about your friends and neighbors.

Coleman University values the legacy of Hispanic influence and we will be taking this month to celebrate on campus as well as here on our blog. We will be celebrating the Hispanic scientists, inventors, teachers, leaders, and artists that are a part of United States and global history. Join us as we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month!

 

If you are interested in starting on the path to a successful career in technology, call us for information about our degree programs. Classes start every ten weeks (Graduate classes start every five weeks), and we offer flexible scheduling! Call (858) 499-0202 to speak to an Admissions representative Monday through Thursday from 8:00am-6:00pm, and Fridays from 8:00am-3:00pm

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Transferable Skills–Bob Sweigart

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Transferable skills are those that utilize any of these examples of marketable skills for a resume. Think about what work or volunteer experiences have shaped you and think about how that experience transfers to a resume.

Many times I am asked by a student or graduate if it is important to include professional experience that is not related to their field of study on their resume. My advice is don’t be afraid to include positions that aren’t directly related to your field of study, especially if you have limited work experience.  You can use this experience to demonstrate what we call “transferable skills” that can really upgrade your resume.

Some examples of transferable skills would include, meeting deadlines, ability to delegate and plan, results oriented, customer service oriented, supervision of others, increasing sales or efficiency, instructing others, good time management, solving problems, managing money/budgets, managing people, meeting the public, organizing people, organizing/managing projects, team player, written and oral communications and working independently. So where does that type of knowledge and experience actually come from? These skills can be honed and developed in many ways including after school programs you have participated in, childcare work, volunteer work, school projects, and even as a result of hobbies that you enjoy. One of the best ways to understand the organization of these skills is to put them into categories similar to those published by Princeton University. Think back on all of the past responsibilities that you have had, even things you did for your relatives, and how those responsibilities could be perceived in a formal work environment.

Look at the job description, responsibilities and required experience and think about what you may have done or learned that could be applied. If a job is looking for someone who has managerial experience and you have never been a manager, but you have supervised a group of volunteers or worked as a lead on an important college project, that might be a way for you show that you have the experience they are looking for.

However, if you feel that your transferable skills are not as good as you want them to be, my advice is do NOT overstate the skills that you do have. If an interviewer asks you details pertaining to a skill that you have listed and you don’t have any answers, your interview will soon be over. If you list that you have managerial experience when in reality you worked alone, that won’t go over well. Take the time to work on your speaking skills and be your own promoter instead!

“Take the time to work on your speaking skills and be your own promoter instead!”

It is often important that you can identify and give examples of the transferable skills that you have developed — this will go a long way to persuading prospective employers that you are right for the job. Don’t be afraid to apply for a job if you do not have the exact experience they are asking for because you could still be the exact candidate that they are looking for.

For more career oriented advice, visit the Career Services staff at Coleman University. All of our current students and alumni are eligible to receive Career Services assistance and we have many resources to help our community find long lasting careers. Call 1 858 499 0202 today!

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ENVI Makes a Splash at Prestigious Robosub Competition

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We often speak of ENVI and their indoor drone testing facility located on the Coleman Campus as a major hub of development for autonomous flying. However there is more “under the hood” at ENVI than that. This year marks the second in a row that the team of volunteers, students, and mentors at ENVI has competed in the 2017 International RoboSub Competition which showcases the best in RoboSub development from across the globe. From July 24th-30th colleges and universities from as far away as China, India, and Russia also competed for the honor of showcasing the best in RoboSub technology.

Every year this competition is hosted at the SSC Pacific TRANSDEC Pool in San Diego, and the pool is supervised by the U.S. Navy Seals who dive to retrieve the subs and move them to their starting positions. The course must be traversed by the RoboSub through various obstacles and challenges within 30 minutes, and contestants have the ability to start over as many times as needed. The big catch is that the time does not start over when a team decides to go back to the starting line. The sub must be retrieved by a Navy Seal diver and brought back to the start in order to try the course again. Luckily teams get to rotate time in the pool before the competition begins in order to make changes and begin to strategize their way through the course. Despite a slightly rough start, over the course of the week long competition against 43 other teams, the team at ENVI was able to qualify in the final round on Saturday and put their name on the leaderboard.

The top three schools this year were Cornell University (USA/First Place), Far Eastern Federal University/Institute for Marine Technology (Russia/Second Place), and the National University of Singapore (Singapore/Third Place). Each of the top teams received a cash prize and international recognition in the world of autonomous underwater vehicles. However prizes were not just awarded to the best contestants. Other teams had the chance to win monetary prizes for “Best Static Entry”, “Best PR”, “Best New Entry”, “Best Presentation”, and “Sportsmanship”.

For two years in a row the ENVI team was able to qualify with their robosub and next year should be just as exciting. In the world of robosub development there are many possibilities for improvement and innovation, and we at Coleman are looking forward to seeing what ENVI has in store for their next competition. For more information on the Robonation competition visit their website at http://www.robonation.org/competition/robosub.

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Effective Leaders are Constant Learners: Bob Sweigart

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Effective leaders are not afraid to learn something new and keep their minds active through professional development and training. It is important for any professional to be willing to learn whenever they can to improve their work culture.

 As a student or graduate of a technology focused University, it is crucial for you to show not only a mastery of your craft, but also that you have the hard skills needed to be a successful employee and peer. When you review a job description, you are going to assume the company wants you to do A, B and C and have X, Y and Z skills. While it is essential to have these hard skills at your disposal, you need to show the ability to learn new skills. Being the best choice for a position is more than what you have achieved on paper; it is also what you are willing to do as a professional to continue to be the best.

The first step in becoming a successful professional is being able to read between the lines to see past what your employer is asking of you, and understand what you can do that isn’t asked for, but could potentially be of value to the company. As an example, during a college internship, a student was tasked to complete a project and realized that there was software that could be used to assist with the effort. The hurdle was that the proposed software required that the student learn a programming language she was not familiar with. Since the student knew the program would greatly improve the chances of completing the project successfully, she took it upon herself to learn the new programming language. It was not just showing the initiative to try a new way of doing things that made this student employee an example.Being excited to learn something new that would not only benefit the employee, but also the company, is an example of what a great employee should be.

Demonstrating you are constantly learning is crucial in the field of technology because as we all know technology is constantly updating and changing itself. In an article published by Inc., the five best practices for learning while on the job include understanding how things work in your office, talking issues out with others who have more experience, and simply throwing yourself entirely into something new that you have yet to encounter (Inc., 2014). The Harvard Business Review writes that leaders are better when they are also learners. In order to be effective as a leader, the avenues of creativity and innovation have to be open and that means bringing in new perspectives and protocols (Harvard Business Review, 2015). Learning does not stop once you exit a classroom; to be a high performing employee and a powerful leader you should look for opportunities to learn in every challenge that comes your way.

Thank you to Bob Sweigart, our Director of Career Services for his contribution to the Coleman blog. For more Career oriented advice, resume building assistance, help signing up for e-Hired, and interview prep, visit the Career Services staff at Coleman University or email careerservices@coleman.edu for more information.

 

 

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Faculty Spotlight: Anthony Le (Game Development)

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What did your parents say when you told them that your plans were for your future? Were they happy about your decision, or did you change your mind all on your own? One of the benefits of obtaining a degree in technology is that your skills and career path are destined for a long life. Your passions are what shape your future, and that rings true no matter the circumstances. That is the theme for our Faculty Spotlight this month as we sit down with Anthony Le, a senior Game Development and Software Development instructor for Coleman University, who started out with a very different career path in mind.
Enrolling as a medical student at UCSD, Le realized that he was not meant to enter the field of medicine. After a thrilling class in physics, Le found that he was more interested in the mechanical way that the world worked, rather than the biological. From there he began his career in technology through computer programming and artificial intelligence. We asked him about his life in technology and his passion for teaching at Coleman University.

1. What was it like moving to the US?
We moved out to the United States in the 1975 after the Vietnam War when I was nine years old. At the time my father worked for a shipping company in the US and the first place we were brought to was Camp Pendleton. So all of my family came to the US at the same time. We settled in Bayou la Batre, Alabama because that’s where my father’s shipping company was based. It was also the setting for the movie Forest Gump. At the time the southern states were very anti-communist, and my family was deeply Catholic, so they welcomed us with open arms and we had a better time adjusting. We went to Alabama, and I had the BEST time. All of these people, our neighbors, town folks, would come over every day and give us stuff and check in to see if we were okay, so my experience in Alabama was wonderful. However my Dad didn’t like it as much as I did, because he wanted to be back in California with the rest of his family, so he rented a big U-Haul and drove everybody back. That was 1976, and my family has lived here in San Diego ever since. I went to Serra High School in Tierrasanta and graduated at Mt. Carmel in Rancho Penasquitos. I was yearbook photographer there and won several drafting and photography awards from the Del Mar Fair.

2. So you stayed in California for college and went to UCSD. Is that were you became interested in technology?
I love UCSD. It is a great school and much bigger than it was when I was there. That feeling of being on a college campus, making friends in the dorms—it was like its own city. I changed my major several times while I was there. My family wanted me to be a doctor and get a good job, so I started out with bio-chemistry and I quickly discovered that I didn’t like it, but I loved my computer science classes. Turns out one of the faculty members at UCSD was a family friend and he was teaching physics, so he got me into that and I became a TA for his program and for the computer lab. Physics simulations were really my first computing job at UCSD. I fell in love with computer programming after that and changed my major to Cognitive Science, which was a nice mix of biology and the physiological makeup of the human body. I learned and dreamt about how those mental processes can one day be emulated with computing. So that was around the time when an Artificial Intelligence major was introduced at UCSD, and I jumped on that program and that was my final change of major. I also have minors in philosophy, psychology, and astronomy (because I love studying the planets).

3. What were you like as a student?
I was a very active student. Besides being a TA in the computer lab, I was a member of the Vietnamese Student Association, and I became president and tried to get our club more involved with other club events on campus. I organized an International Volleyball Player’s club and organized a Hands Across UCSD event for the campus, and it was really tough to get all of the logistics together, but it was a really fun to try to get everyone involved. By that time my sister and my cousin were attending UCSD, so it became a family affair. Overall, UCSD was an amazing experience, and that is where I cultivated my love of learning.

4. Once you graduated with your degree in A. I. where did you go? Did you create robots?
I wanted to work in computing, and my relative had a chain of computer stores, so I started working for them when I graduated from college. I was in charge of writing programs for diagnostic and performance testing and for keeping tabs on all of the inventory and OCR (optical character recognition) programs used to process all the orders. Unfortunately, this chain did not win out over its competition, so my relative moved into a different field—buying and selling prescription medications from Canada to patients in the US. So I wrote all the programs to scrape and accumulate all of the data on prescription medications (this was before Big Data was around) and price match for the lowest prices. Then the government changed the law and we could no longer sell lower-priced prescription medication from abroad. With my 20 plus years of programming experience, I ended up getting into teaching through my wife at the time, who knew the Vice President of Coleman University was looking for programmers who had real experience and wanted to teach. I came to Coleman when the Game Development department was still in the process of creation, so I was involved in writing the courses for Game Development. We had to write six classes and establish a certification program. I wrote Course 2 and Course 5, which were about Engine design and 3D rendering (for networked first-person shooter (FPS) and third-person shooter (TPS)). The algorithms for 3D rendering use the same technology and mathematical calculating processes as Artificial Intelligence and neural network programs. It’s the summation of a lot of values and the manipulation of numbers simultaneously. It is a lot of complex ideas, and that is the challenge of teaching: getting students to relate to the material and understand it, so they will be excited to learn.

5. Did you find that you had a passion for teaching after you began at Coleman?
Turns out, from all of my experience as an eldest sibling and as a TA in college, this is my calling. It fits me, because I can explore what I love to learn, and using what I know about AI and how the brain works thus far, to facilitate and transfer that knowledge to another person, using a many sensory modalities as possible. For me this was a fateful event, and I went with it. That was over 7 years ago. Now, I am focusing on helping our students learn physical computing, like how to program robots, sensors, GUIs, and different hardware devices to enhance their job placement. Our students are so excited to learn and Game Programming is very competitive, so I am working on introducing physical computing using Python and C into Game Development and Software Development. Even though I love games and created my first game using the VIC20 and Commodore 64, I am not a gamer per se, I am more into computing. I want to bring more programming into the Game Development program. When a student is hands on and sees his or her creation, and it’s something that’s tangible, that is the experience we want. Computing is a tool with a specific language and you need to understand the syntax to express how you want to control the technology.

6. What do you look for in a potential student at Coleman University? What advice do you have for a new Coleman student?
What I love ideally, is excitement. When students are excited, they are learning and progress goes up exponentially. My advice is perseverance. You cannot learn everything in one try. It is a process and especially with programming, you have to do it in many different ways and solve many different errors. In solving errors you learn something new. You can read about it and watch it, but until you do it and spend the time fixing it, you will not actually learn. The more you put yourself through this process the better prepared you will be, so use repetition and that will help you excel and gain experience. Education is an investment, so I would advise anyone who is learning a new skill to keep in mind that commitment to an investment. I will always give students a chance to solve things on their own, and then I step in to help by providing strategies and hints. I often discuss the various ways that people solve the same problem, and my motto is if you don’t agree, at least try it once, and if you realize you like it you can incorporate it into your own style. Be open minded.

 

We want to thank Mr. Le for taking the time to sit with us and discuss his passion for teaching and computer science.  If you are interested in pursuing a technology-focused degree and learn from instructors such as Anthony Le, do not hesitate to call us. Classes start every ten weeks and financial aid is available for those who qualify. Call (858) 499-0202 today!

 

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Coleman is Ranked #1 in San Diego!

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Recently our University was pleased to find that we had been ranked number one in San Diego for Cybersecurity degrees by Universities.com. If you did not already know, Coleman has had the longest running Cybersecurity (formerly Network Security) degree program in San Diego. Since 1963 when we first began our journey as The Automation Institute, our organization has been at the center of technology development and we have graduated many distinguished alumni over our 54 years in Southern California. From Data Processing to Cybersecurity we have come a long way by following the trends and seeing the potential in every student that walks through our door.  Our alumni have gone on to work for SPAWAR, Cisco, Kyocera, and many other incredible companies that are the leaders in technology development. With our lifetime Career Services access and small class sizes our students have been able to create lucrative careers in exciting fields. More importantly, they have brought integrity to the Coleman name and we are proud to continue to provide a top Cybersecurity education for San Diego. Our mission statement is “To deliver relevant education that prepares individuals for technology focused careers, while providing an environment where they may develop to their full potential” and we will remain dedicated to that mission long into our future. This is exciting news for our university and we are so happy to share it with our followers and alumni!!

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Coleman and Ssubi give back to San Diego

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Our President, Norbert Kubilus, stands next to the donated computers from Sharp Healthcare that Coleman will be helping to refurbish. Ssubi is located behind the Graduate Studies building. 

Coleman University’s mission statement is “To deliver relevant education that prepares individuals for technology-focused careers, while providing an environment where they may develop to their full potential”. That mission statement is not just focused on our learning environments. Our emphasis on developing to a full potential also applies to the various opportunities that Coleman is bringing to our students that take place outside of the classroom and within our community. Since 2016 we have provided a portion of a warehouse for the non-profit Ssubi to operate out of, as well as encouraged our students to work with them to collect and ship donations around the world. This organization has taken on the enormous task of processing gently used medical equipment from local hospitals and clinics and distributing to areas in Africa that have no access to basic and essential medical materials. The founder, Laura Luxemburg, has worked tirelessly throughout Southern California to encourage the leaders in the Healthcare industry to be more conscious of their potential impact through conservation and to donate their equipment to communities who need it. It is her goal to bring jobs to our city in an environment that promotes conservation. Through efforts in connection with Sharp Healthcare and the San Diego Veterans Association, Laura has been successful in reaching the first part of her overall goal for Ssubi: the potential millions of tons of medical waste that can be reused are being saved from landfills. Sustainability is important for helping to make San Diego a Green city and Coleman University wants to be a part of that movement.

In conjunction with their effort called Greening for Good, Ssubi is also offering gently used computer equipment to low income families in San Diego. Our University has provided Ssubi with a center on our campus to clean, store, and refurbish 50 computers that were donated by Sharp Healthcare. Using the Cybersecurity Club room which serves as a lab on our campus, student volunteers are installing new software and returning the equipment to their factory settings. Once each computer has been cleaned, they will be donated to local shelters and families who may not have access to computer equipment. Computer and internet literacy are vital skills that will help every child become more successful in their academic careers. Coleman is dedicated to promoting this literacy effort and we are doing our part by donating equipment to help maintain an equal educational playing field for young learners and their parents. We hope to continue to work closely with Ssubi again in the future, and we look forward to seeing all of the delighted faces of the families who will be receiving these donations.

For more information on the on-going efforts of Ssubi please visit their website: http://www.ssubi.org/ or check out their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ssubiishope/

 

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