Coleman Sponsors the National Diversity Council for Women’s History Month

Share Button

Many of our community members know the name Coleman Furr, and they know that he is the namesake of our institution. However, what you may not know is that our university was co-founded by a woman. Louis Furr was a visionary in the same way that her husband was, and she too saw a future for technology that included everyone with a passion to learn. In her memory, and the memory of all the women that we have taught since 1963, Coleman has been an avid proponent of diversity in the STEM fields. We continue to look for ways to engage the community around this important topic, especially in regards to encouraging more women to establish a career in technology. During Women’s History month, we sponsored and hosted the California Diversity Council for their Women in Leadership: Women Blazing Trails symposium which took place on March 14th. Female leaders from all over Southern California were on our campus discussing their personal experience with adversity and challenges in their careers.

The panel of speakers included Stacie Herring, Vice President of Consumer Services Experience at Intuit, Angelica Espinoza, Vice President of Compliance and Governance and Corporate Secretary at Sempra Energy, Sadie Stern, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer at 3D Systems, Judy Wright. Vice President of Human Resources for Valley View Casino & Hotel, Denise Brucker, Vice President of Compliance, Labor & Employment for Cubic Corporation, and Dr. Ilkay Altintas, the Chief Data Officer for the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego. Leading the panel as moderator was Dr. Merrilyn Datta, the Head of Business Operations at Illumina, who engaged the audience with her own stories of her experiences and engaging attendees in a powerful discussion. Some of the main points of discussion that came to light were the importance of speaking your mind, being unafraid to ask for more resources, and taking risks in expanding your horizons.

From culturally conscious leadership, to swimming with sharks and building a value for your personal brand, the panelists covered important topics and invited attendees to ask questions. Many members of the audience had the opportunity to establish important networking connections, and learn more about resources available to them in San Diego. The National Diversity Council will be hosting many more events like this one here in California, if you are interested in attending please visit the events page on their website.

Share Button

What is Software Development?

Share Button

So you’ve been thinking about software development? You’ve imagined yourself in front of a computer screen writing the next great mobile application or piece of software, and working as an important member of a powerful team. Well, that scenario is actually pretty accurate, but there is more to being a software developer, or engineer than you might think. Read on to find out more about what it means to be a software developer and how you can put yourself on the path to a rewarding technical career.

A Software Development career requires a broad range of skills. The process can be challenging and those who succeed are willing to do the hard work. In addition to working with clients and other professionals, developers create a set of design patterns or algorithms that form the foundation for usable software. They also recommend upgrades or changes to existing software. They maintain detailed records supporting all work products. Some practitioners work in vibrant groups with other designers and some are freelance developers who work independently to create software for single users or smaller companies.

Software developers are detail-oriented. They are eternal optimists who trust that with effort they can succeed. They are meticulous in crafting, testing and improving the software. This field, according to the Department of Labor’s Professions Outlook is wide open with opportunities to make a good income and opportunities for advancement. This is expected to remain true for years to come.

The Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC) for Coleman University Blog

                The Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC)

If this sounds like the type of career that you have been looking for, perhaps it is time to get back into the classroom and make software development your future career. Coleman University’s software development faculty has prepared a focused set of courses that supports gaining the necessary skills for success. A new class starts every 10 weeks and, with five enrollment times per year, and tutoring is offered to students for free. Coleman has a dedicated career services department to help you find that first job and will provide support throughout your career. A career in Software Development provides the basis for pride in craftsmanship and the comfort of working in professional teams.

 

Thank you to our Software Development Faculty Chair, Leticia Rabor for writing this great article! If you would like to learn more about Leticia check out her interview from last year when she visited the Android Developers Conference in San Francisco. Or check out her Faculty Spotlight interview here!

 

Coleman University has been a technology-focused institution of higher learning since 1963. Our accelerated Software Development program give students the opportunity to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in as little as three years (depending on course load). If this blog has inspired you to think about your future in Software Development give us a call at (858) 499-0202.

Coleman University logo

Share Button

Women’s History Month: Developing the Foundations for Modern Technology

Share Button

Last month we talked about the African American women who changed the face of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, despite adversity and oppression. Since March 1st marks the start of Women’s History Month, we are going to continue our acknowledgement of the women behind the modern technological age. We discussed the pioneers Ada Lovelace and Grace Hopper in a previous blog post (which you can read here) but there is a long list of women who have come after them who have created their own legacy in STEM. If there is someone missing from this list, feel free to add them in the comments!

Susan Kare
When you think of Apple, most likely you’ll picture Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak. Or maybe the first image that comes to mind will be the computer itself, a large and heavy object with a screen the size of a notepad. However, one of the names that you might not recognize is Susan Kare. Behind the scenes, she was in charge of developing the typography and iconic graphics for the launch of the original Apple Macintosh computer. Many of the interface elements that have become common in their products were designed by Kare, like the command symbol on their keyboard. Remember the “Happy Mac” that greeted you when you booted up your system? That was Susan Kare’s design!

Hedy Lamarr
You might not know Hedy Lamarr’s acting career, but you have definitely used her invention in your daily life now. She conceptualized the first ideas for frequency hopping (sending radio signals from different frequency channels). The basis for the idea was to help the Navy launch torpedos through remote control, and block communications from being interfered with. Despite the fact that this technology would have been way ahead of its time, the Navy was not interested and passed on the invention. However, Lamarr’s design would find its use in the 1950’s when the concept was used for secure military communications. This new use paved the way for Hedy Lamarr’s concept to become the foundation for modern Bluetooth and Wifi technology.

Roberta Williams
When videogames became popular in the 1980’s, the at-home console was a huge seller and brands like Atari took the market by storm. However there was a revolution coming and Roberta Williams was one of its leaders. It was her creation “King’s Quest” that would create the market for PC gaming. Her company Sierra On-Line would help to shape the future of video games with their more complex puzzle designs and storylines. Games that take the main character on a quest before they can compete against a final “boss” are inspired by her original design.

Radia Perlman
A member of the Internet Hall of Fame, Radia Perlman designed the spanning tree algorithm that transformed Ethernet from single-wire CSMA/CD into a protocol that can handle large information clouds. She also designed Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL), which allows Ethernet to make optimal use of bandwidth. Perlman holds over 100 patents and has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from Unisex and the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Data Communication. She holds BS and MS degrees in Mathematics from MIT, and completed her PhD in Computer Science through MIT as well.

Kimberly Bryant (Black Girls Code)
After earning her degree in Electrical Engineering from Vanderbilt University, and a successful career in the bay area near San Francisco, Bryant decided to dedicate her life to helping more African American women achieve their dreams in STEM. She founded Black Girls Code in 2011 to bring classes and workshops to her community that focused on helping underrepresented girls learn computer programming, coding, website development, and robotics. Her foundation now had chapters in seven states, and across the globe in Johannesburg, South Africa, and even offers programs in Spanish! To learn more about her organization and all of their community work visit: www.blackgirlscode.com

Sister Mary Kenneth Keller
Though she was a devout nun her whole life, Sister Mary Kenneth Keller was the first woman in the United States to earn a PhD in Computer Science. She entered into the convent in 1932, and earned her BS in Mathematics and her MS in Physics from DePaul University. However, it was during her time studying at Dartmouth College in the 1960s that she developed the BASIC computer language which made it possible for anyone to write custom code. Suddenly developers didn’t need to have a mathematics or science degree to be able to code their own programs. Keller’s dissertation, written in CDC FORTRAN 63, was titled “Inductive Inference on Computer Generated Patterns.” In 1965, she became the first American woman to earn a PhD in Computer Science. She envisioned a future of computers that would help teach and stimulate cognitive development for all.

Carol Shaw
Considered the first female professional video game designer, Carol Shaw worked for the Atari company programming games for the VCS console before leaving to work for Activision. The now famous River Raid game for the Atari 2600 was her design and is considered to be one of the best examples of game design in history. However, even though she was an equal member of the team, she still faced discrimination, even from the President of Atari. During a walk through, he remarked “Oh, at last! We have a female game designer. She can do cosmetics color matching and interior decorating cartridges!” You can read more about her life in game development on the Vintage Computing Website.

Adele Goldberg
A prominent software developer, Adele Goldberg is one of the designers of the SmallTalk-80 programming language. While working at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) she would become the manager of the System Concepts Laboratory where her team would finish the SmallTalk-80 program. She served as president of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) from 1984 to 1986, and, together with Alan Kay and Dan Ingalls, received the ACM Software Systems Award in 1987. Many of the concepts she and her team developed at PARC became the basis for graphically based user interfaces, replacing the earlier command line based systems.

There are thousands more women who have made great strides in technology development who also deserve recognition on this list. This month, take the opportunity to learn more about the extraordinary women who have made history in STEM. You can tell us about them here in the comments!

 

 

The first degree conferred by Coleman University (then the Automation Institute) was to a woman, for Data Processing in 1964. It has been our mission since we were first established to ensure that all of our students have equal access to education, and resources to pursue their passion to turn their ‘Dreams Into Reality’. What could you do with a degree in Software Development, Cybersecurity, or Game Development from Coleman University?

Coleman University logo

Share Button

African American Women in Technology: Persevering Through Adversity

Share Button

In an age when we are launching new rocket designs into space, and sending information instantly over wireless channels, there is still a gender gap in the #STEM fields. The first computer programmer in the world was a woman named Ada Lovelace, and modern binary code was developed by a Navy engineer named Grace Hopper. Yet, there is still a whole community, spanning generations, of African American women who have moved us forward in STEM development and have received little recognition for their contributions. In this blog post we are going to celebrate the African American women who have used their intelligence and ingenuity to pursue their passion for science, technology, engineering, and math, despite adversity.

Katherine Johnson:
As recently portrayed in the movie Hidden Figures, Katherine Johnson was a genius mathematician whose calculations helped to get the first astronauts to the moon. When John Glenn learned that the calculations for his orbital flight in 1962 were being done by a computer, he refused to go into space until Katherine herself confirmed that they were correct. After 33 years working for NASA, Katherine retired in 1986, and 20 years later she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.
Henrietta Lacks:
Though she was not a scientist or doctor, Henrietta Lacks is still one of the most influential people in medicine to this day. On January 29, 1951, Lacks went to Johns Hopkins Hospital to diagnose abnormal pain and bleeding in her abdomen. Physician Howard Jones quickly diagnosed her with cervical cancer. During her subsequent radiation treatments, doctors removed two cervical samples from Lacks without her knowledge. She died at Johns Hopkins on October 4, 1951, at the age of 31. Ms. Lacks’ blood cells were able to multiply at rates that had never been seen before, or since and her blood cells were kept without her knowledge for research and are still being used in labs across the country today. The line of cells that there made from her sample were named the HeLa line, ironically to honor Henrietta. Jonas Salk used the HeLa strain to develop the polio vaccine, and since then her cells have contributed to over 10,000 patents. Unfortunately she never knew about her contribution to science and her family was never compensated by the labs that used her blood without permission for their research. For more information about her life and the importance of her contribution to science, read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.
Lilia Ann Abron:
The first African American woman to earn a PhD in Chemical Engineering in the United States at the University of Iowa, Lilia Ann Abron has made incredible achievements in her field since she began her career in 1972. Abron founded PEER Consultants in 1978, an environmental engineering consulting firm that provides solutions to the problems of contamination of the environment. In 1995, Abron founded Peer Africa with the mission of building energy-efficient homes in post-apartheid South Africa. Peer Africa’s Witsand iEEECO (Integrated Energy Environment Empowerment-cost Optimization) Sustainable Human Settlement won the American Academy of Engineers 2012 Superior Achievement Award. To learn more about Abron’s achievements and community projects visit: thehistorymakers.org.
Dr. Donna Auguste:
A businesswoman and entrepreneur who specialized in software development, Donna Auguste is the genius behind Freshwater Software. Her company, founded in 1996, was created to offer companies the ability to monitor and track their presence on the internet. After she sold the company in 2000 she went on to found the Leave a Little Room Foundation, LLC, a philanthropic organization that helps to provide housing, electricity, and vaccinations to poor communities around the world. Despite adversity from her male peers and instructors, Auguste received her bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science from UC Berkeley and went on to become the first African American woman in the PhD program at Carnegie Mellon University. For more information on Dr. Auguste visit her profile on the NCWIT website.
Dr. Alexa Canady:
Born in 1950, she was the first African American Woman in the United States to become a neurosurgeon. After almost dropping out of her undergraduate program, she gained the confidence to continue her work and went from being a zoology major to medicine. Though initially she was not taken seriously as a doctor, she quickly proved herself to her peers and was voted one of the top residents in her program. Dr. Canady was chief of neurosurgery at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan from 1987 until her retirement in June 2001. She also holds two honorary degrees, and received the Children’s Hospital of Michigan’s Teacher of the Year award in 1984, and was inducted into the Michigan Woman’s Hall of Fame in 1989.
Dr. Jeanette Epps:
Dr. Epps is an astronaut that was selected by NASA in 2009 after serving in the CIA for seven years. She has two doctorates, one for Philosophy (1994) and the other in Aerospace Engineering (2000) from the University of Maryland. The New York native was a NASA Fellow during graduate school and authored several journal and conference articles describing her research.
Evelyn Boyd Granville:
The second African American woman to receive a PhD in mathematics from an American university when she graduated from Yale in 1949, Dr. Granville was a pioneer in the field of computing. In 1952, Granville temporarily abandoned teaching to become a mathematician for the National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.C., her work centering on the analyzation and application of mathematics toward the development of missile fuses. After joining IBM in 1956, she created computer software for NASA’s Project Vanguard and Project Mercury space programs. After leaving her position at NASA, she went back to teaching for 30 years until she retired in 1997.

There are thousands more women who could be added to this list, and we hope that this post inspires you to continue to learn more about the women who brought us into the modern technology age. Despite adversity, aggression, and subversion, these women refused to abandon their dreams of an education and a career in STEM. Their passion led to advancements in the field that are still making a difference today. Feel free to add to this list in the comments and tell us more about the women in the field who have inspired you!

 

The first degree conferred by Coleman University (when it was first named the Automation Institute) was to a young woman for Data Processing in 1964, and we have continued our mission for equality in STEM fields ever since. If you have been thinking about starting your career in Software Development, Cybersecurity, or Game Development we have classes that start every ten weeks, so you can pick when you want to start on your degree path! Give us a call at (858) 499-0202 to learn more about our degree programs and career services opportunities.

Coleman University logo

Share Button

Cybersecurity in History: The Elk Cloner Virus

Share Button

In 2017, Cybersecurity Ventures predicted that by 2019 a business will become the target of a ransomware attack every 14 seconds. The average budget for cybersecurity measures is expected to exceed $1 Trillion by 2021, and the number of open jobs for cybersecurity experts is fast outgrowing the number of available applicants (CSO Online). It seems that “cybersecurity” is a hot button topic today, but where did this trend start? Where did the first computer virus come from? In late January of 1982, a 15 year-old programmer named Richard Skrenta inadvertently created the first computer virus (outside of a lab) that spread through infected floppy discs “in the wild”. Ironically it was written as a joke!

The first computers, such as the ENIAC, were built at the beginning of the 20th century and were used mostly for computing large sums and for breaking codes during war time. These behemoth machines took up entire floors of buildings and required constant monitoring and maintenance. Over time these computers become smaller, faster, and more efficient, but they were still individual machines that worked towards a specific computing purpose. With the birth of the modern age of computing and the home computer system, programmers could begin experimenting with their own code and testing the limits of these inventions. Using his personal Apple II computer, Richard Skrenta began creating a boot sector virus to infect floppy discs and spread itself to any Apple II computer that booted up using the infected floppy disc by putting the virus into the computer’s memory. His virus would become the first in history to spread “in the wild” and exist outside of a computer laboratory; meaning that any floppy discs that were inserted into an infected computer, were immediately infected and could then pass the virus on to another system. The virus was essentially harmless and was intended to annoy its victims more than attack them. Elk Cloner was designed so that once the Apple II computer had been booted up 50 times after being infected, a poem would display on the screen:

Elk Cloner:

The program with a personality

It will get on all your disks

It will infiltrate your chips

Yes it’s Cloner!

It will stick to you like glue

It will modify ram too

Send in the Cloner!

Once computer developers began installing hard drives into computers instead of relying on floppy discs for memory, this type of virus was no longer effective. Today the threat of digital security is greater than an infected floppy disc that only affects the device you have in your home, and it can be much more detrimental to your system than an unwanted poem on your screen. In a report by ISACA it was projected that over the next 2-4 years there will be an estimated skills gap of almost 2 million in the field of Cybersecurity. The Cybersecurity industry is seeing a sharp spike in hacking attempts and recent scandals, such as the Equifax data breach in 2017, have shown that the cybersecurity needs of major corporations are not being met. Imagine what opportunities are waiting for you with a degree in Cybersecurity!  On average, a Cybersecurity professional will have a yearly salary of $116,000, almost double the national median income reported for 2016! If you have a passion for online safety and love a challenge, think of a degree in Cybersecurity as a part of your future and call us at (858) 499-0202!

Coleman University logo

Share Button

Cybersecurity is in Demand

Share Button

There are 1.8 Million Unfilled Cybersecurity Jobs in the United States,

So where are the Workers?

One of the fastest growing, and best paying, job fields in the United States is also becoming one of the least populated. According to the International Information System Security Certification Consortium, or (ISC)², by 2022 there will be an estimated 1.8 million jobs in Cybersecurity that will go unfilled. This number increased from the initial estimate in 2015 of 1.5 million by 2020. So why are these jobs sitting vacant?  Will they be filled at all? One of the most significant causes is the documented lack of interest by Millennials in Cybersecurity. In a recent study by the Center for Cybersafety and Education, only 7% of those cybersecurity professionals in the field who were surveyed are under the age of 29, while the vast majority is over the age of 40. That large majority is on the verge of retiring, and that shift will only increase the number of open jobs in this field. But the field of Cybersecurity isn’t that hard to get into. With a degree in Cybersecurity, or even experience in software development or programming, this career path is one in which anyone with an interest in technology can succeed.

 

An article from Forbes Magazine claims that the Millennial generation sees Cybersecurity from a different perspective than their older peers (such as their parents and grandparents) because they have grown up living with computer and internet technology as part of their everyday lives. The concerns that face younger generation online, such as the security of cloud-based platforms, and password-protected sites, are much different than when the internet was first established. Ironically Millennials are MORE aware of cyber threats than previous generations, but they are less likely than Baby-boomers to take extra precautions to safeguard their information and documentation, especially on social media. On average, a Millennial will use 3-5 passwords for their various profiles in order to ensure security; however, that proactive behavior doesn’t seem to translate into an interest in Cybersecurity because this group tends to reuse the same password for multiple sites. Unfortunately there is not enough awareness of this career field in comparison to other technology-focused options to bring more students into the classroom. Compounding this lack of interest are the assumptions that Cybersecurity is the same as any other IT field and that there is no need to specialize, or that years of extensive training are needed to become a high-level security expert. Those assumptions are very wrong.

Every year in the U.S., 40,000 jobs for information security analysts go unfilled, and employers are struggling to fill 200,000 other cyber-security related roles, according to cyber security data tool CyberSeek

Many Cybersecurity specialists only need a few years of training in order to obtain an entry-level security position. The average salary for a Cybersecurity professional according to CIO, citing a survey conducted by Semper Secure, is around $116,000 annually (roughly $55.77 per hour). More specialized positions such as Chief Information Security Officer, or Lead Software Security Engineer, have an average salary of $200,000. That number is three times the national median income! In fact, many of the almost 1.8 million jobs in Cybersecurity are located right here in California. Companies such as Google, IBM, Cisco, and Facebook have a high demand for Cybersecurity specialists and that demand will only grow in the next ten years as cloud-based computing becomes more prevalent. Those cybersecurity specialists who take and maintain high level certifications such as the CISSP are more likely to achieve an even higher salary!

 

In order to make a career in cybersecurity more accessible, Coleman University created an expedited degree program of three years or less (depending on status and credits transferred) for a Bachelor’s of Science in Cybersecurity. Students earn their degree while also taking advantage of our Career Services department to find jobs in the field. Alumni also have the advantage of a lifetime of career services assistance from our experienced advisers.

 

If you have been looking for a more lucrative career, and have a passion for technology and making the online world more secure, think about Cybersecurity as your future! With the growing demand for professionals, and over a million potential jobs to choose from, this field has plenty of opportunity for those who want to take it. At Coleman University, we can make that goal happen faster, and with the help of our instructors who have years of experience in the field and in the classroom. Call Coleman today at (858) 499-0202 to schedule a tour!

 

Share Button

Celebrate National Trivia Day with Coleman University!

Share Button

January 4th is National Trivia Day and we want to share some fun facts about us! As you know, Coleman University was established here in San Diego in 1963 by Dr. Coleman and Mrs. Lois Furr. Our first building was in Downtown San Diego, and since our first graduating class; we have been making history in this amazing city. Check out our list of some of the top 10 most interesting trivia facts about Coleman University, and if you’re an alumnus, feel free to share your own trivia in the comments!

  1. Coleman’s original mainframe was named Kermit; the name was changed to Papa Bear in the 1990’s.
  2. Coleman University (then Coleman College) presented its first lecture about the internet and the World Wide Web in 1991. The internet was not even being accessed commercially at this point by users at home; that came later in 1995.
  3. In the 1990s Coleman was the home of the Computer Museum of America, whose mission was to collect, preserve, and exhibit historic computer equipment and artifacts.
  4. Coleman (then the Automation Institute) conferred the first degree in Data Processing issued by a private data processing institution in the state of California in 1963. The degree was conferred to Jean Thomas by Doctor Coleman Furr, our co-founder.
  5. Our second location was in Old Town San Diego, at 2425 San Diego Avenue. Today that location is now a storefront; you might not even recognize it with all of the changes!
  6. Over the years Coleman has had a successful track team and softball team that competed in events across San Diego.
  7. Our Co-founder, Dr. Coleman Furr, was a friend of Grace Hopper (the inventor of modern binary code for programming) and since the founding of our institution Coleman has always dedicated a hall on our campus in her name.
  8. From 1974-1976, Coleman College supplied 38-42% of all the initial Data Processing workers needed during the early days of building mainframes to begin automating City and County Government offices in San Diego.
  9. On September 12, 2015 the White House, through their “College Scorecard” software named Coleman University as a school whose students graduate on time, get good jobs and can pay off their loans quickly.
  10. On Jan 26, 2017 – Coleman University became host to “Hornet’s Nest,” San Diego’s first publically-available Indoor UAV drone flight, test, and training facility. It is open 11AM-2PM every Saturday in the B Building located on the West side of the campus.

Since 1963, it has been the philosophy of the Automation Institute, Coleman College, and Coleman University to bring career opportunities and accessible education to any and all people who wanted to learn. Technology was a passion for our founder, and that passion is still here today. We can’t wait to see what history we continue to make here at Coleman and in San Diego!

 

If you are interested in taking your own passion for technology and turning it into a career, call us today at (858) 499-0202 and we would be happy to give you a tour! (Tours are available in Spanish).

Become a part of our history, and look to your own future, at Coleman University!

Coleman University Technology Focused Careers

Share Button

How Do I Sign Up for the Global Game Jam 2018??

Share Button

We’ve already talked about the Global Game Jam on this blog; and the fact that this opportunity to compete in a global challenge with other gamers is one that can’t be missed. So now that we’ve peaked your interest, this blog will tell you what you should know about the #GGJ2018 and what to prepare for once you’ve signed up.

To start with, we want to tell you what your ticket purchase includes. The hosts of the Global Game Jam event at Coleman, the IGDA, have dedicated the funds from the event to providing food for the participants as well as other resources to help make this event as awesome as possible for all who attend! Starting Friday evening on January 26, 2018 participants will start arriving at the Coleman campus to set up their equipment and find spots to get settled in. You can bring in your own computers, laptops, and monitors to use for the weekend as well as any other special resources that you need to effectively code or design. Since the participants will be here from Friday night to Sunday afternoon Coleman University has not only provided campus space for this event, we will be making sure that there is a computer for everyone who registers. The point of this event is to mimic the conditions and stresses of game design and development so make sure that you come prepared to work hard, but we want you to be comfortable while doing it! So if you prefer to code in your bunny slippers, make sure to bring them along too.

What if you don’t have any team members lined up when you register? Well that is certainly no problem. Once the theme for the challenge is announced on Friday night, participants will then have the opportunity to discuss their ideas with others, and teams will form based on which projects participants want to join. The proposed projects will not all be videogame based because board games, card games, and any other styles of game are all welcome submissions. Since the submissions don’t have to be a videogame, participants who do not have coding experience are not excluded from being a part of this event. A passion for gaming and creating fun projects is the only requirement needed! The fun comes from the thrill of joining a team and bringing a great game to life in only three days.

Once teams have finished their projects, they will be submitted to the Global Game Jam site and published. Visitors to the site can still see games from previous years and even play some of them as well! For a game developer or designer, this can be a great addition to any resume and will add invaluable experience to help put you ahead. Being able to perfect your teamwork and problem solving skills while also creating a game from scratch is something that many recruiters look for in a potential hire. Why not put the Global Game Jam onto your resume this year?

If your family or friends are interested in seeing the event and coming by to show support, they are more than welcome! There will be visiting hours for friends and family, however, since time is limited and teams will have to work around the clock, visitors will not be able to stay overnight. We will also have special guests from radio station FM 94.9 on our campus live streaming and getting involved with participants. Hamby from the Casual Gamers podcast will be on our campus broadcasting from his Twitch channel, so you definitely don’t want to miss out on that! Head over to the official Eventbrite page for more information and the link to register as a participant: http://bit.ly/GGJ18Coleman. See you there! #GGJ2018

Turn your passion for gaming, coding, or design into a degree and a lifelong career! With a degree in Game Design from Coleman University, along with all the first-hand professional game development experience of our instructors, our graduates have the knowledge and the connections to build a solid career in game development and design. Call us today to schedule a tour and learn more about our programs at (858) 499-0202! Turn your “Dreams into Reality” now, classes start January 8, 2018!

Share Button

Faculty Spotlight: Ben Mead

Share Button

This month we sat down with an instructor from our Software Development Department, Ben Mead for an interview about his life in technology and his passions. From his early interest in technology, to his current role as an instructor at Coleman University, there is a lot to know about Ben! Read on to find out something new about one of your favorite instructors on our campus.

Have you always lived in San Diego? What was it like growing up in Southern California?

While at this point I’ve been in San Diego for most of my life, I can still wear shorts year round and sometimes find myself longing for a snow day. Nevertheless, this is the city I love and call home.

What was the first experience that you had with technology that inspired you to make it your career?

Growing up on Oregon Trail and the NES showed me there is a lot of fun to be had with electronics. However, it wasn’t until middle school during a Basic Apple class where I thought, “this is what I want to spend my time doing.” I thought it was so cool to write a program that could create a simple pixel police car and make it drive across the screen blinking its light along the way. I was instantly hooked on computers, as they provided me the satisfaction and feedback I needed as a young teen. It did what I what I asked it to do. It also let me know real quickly when I made a mistake, without judgment, and I could then fix it.

What is one of your favorite subjects to teach in your classes?

As a technologist by trade, I am able to bring an experienced perspective, from working in the industry, to my students. One of the benefits of teaching in the Cybersecurity program at Coleman University is that I get to relate each of the classes I teach to current event examples of how criminals and law enforcement are leveraging technology to work through their operational challenges. Additionally, I enjoy creating open forum conversations with each class as they work through team dynamics and coordinated obstacles, so that together they are able to produce an outcome greater than they would individually.

How do you think TV and other media have changed the way that people think about technology and hacking?

Hollywood and the media are hilarious with the way they portray technology and those who use it! They portray outrageous and beyond reasonable examples, ranging from exploding monitors in soap operas to typing the word “cookie” to stop a cookie monster virus. More often than not, the overdramatic misinformation takes away from the beauty of modern technology and the terrifying reality of what is happening in the hacking scene today.

Do you have one type of tech that you can’t live without in your daily life?

Convenience is a key reason anyone adopts a technology. I find myself pretty resourceful but my go-to convenience for work and play has got to be my smartphone. It grants me the ability to terminal in from anywhere and check out the latest cat gif (pronounced like a gift and not like the peanut butter JIF).

What activities or hobbies do you like that have as little to do with tech as possible?

The least tech hobby I’ve got is playing paintball. It’s just so satisfying laying rope down a lane and watching someone run right through it!

How long have you been teaching at Coleman? What’s your favorite class to teach?

The last two years teaching at Coleman have been a fun and enriching experience. It’s hard to pick one class that I’ve enjoyed the best, as each of them has been awesome in their own way.

Do you have any resources, like books or websites, that you recommend for good information about coding and programming?

I recommend that anyone looking for more information on learning coding and programming should talk to one of our Admissions Consultants about what they’re looking to accomplish and how Coleman University can help.

 

 

 

If you are interested in learning about all that you can accomplish with a degree in technology, call us today to set up an appointment with one of our admissions representatives at (858) 499-0202. We are here Monday through Friday to answer all of your questions and help you get started on the path to a lifelong career in technology!

Share Button

Celebrate International Internet Day!

Share Button

   

      What do you consider to be the greatest invention in modern history? Many will suggest the automobile, airplanes, the telephone, or even sliced bread, but there’s one that we think outshines them all. Yes, we are talking about the internet! The internet has created a powerful online community that has spawned countless cultural changes and has greatly influenced our lives. Through social media and email alone we have the ability to instantly connect with our friends and family, as well as new acquaintances from around the world. It is hard to fathom that this invention is technically a new phenomenon; we’ve only had the modern internet since 1989!

Why do we celebrate internet Day on October 29th? On this date in 1969, the first recorded message transmission was sent over an internet connection between two computers. A student at UCLA named Charley Kline attempted to send log in information to another student at Stanford named Bill Duvall and managed to send the letters “L” and “O” before the connection was lost. At the time these two students were working on the ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) which was being funded by the US Department of Defense and consisted of four terminals set up at UCLA, Stanford, UC Santa Barbara, and the University of Utah. Each terminal operated independently testing various connections and after this first message attempt, it only took an hour to send the entire message to Stanford.

Even though this internet connection was the birth of the World Wide Web, it was still uncommon for anyone outside of universities, government agencies, and a few scientific labs to be using it at this time. This year also marked the establishment of HTML and HTTP by Tim Berners-Lee who was working in Britain at CERN. The World Wide Web was officially launched as a project in August of 1991 and you can see the results of that project today when you pick up your smartphone. The digital age in the late 90s and into the early 2000s was an explosion of internet fever with over 162 million new and public websites being created and hosted online. Silicon Valley in Northern California became the epicenter of internet development and the dotcom boom. Today the internet is a central pillar in global communications and almost every notable public figure has their own profile online that their fans can interact with. How much do you use the internet in your daily life?

It is important to note that Coleman University was established in 1963, long before the internet was born. Computers were not developed for internet use, in fact, they were initially conceptualized for computing large sums (hence the name “computer”) and storing information securely. At the time it would have been unheard of to discuss putting a computer into a private home. Why would a family or single person need one? It may be hard to imagine now, but considering the size of the computers that were being built, it would have been hard to fit one inside of a home in the first place!

We recognize Internet Day as a moment to reflect on the incredible advancements in technology that we have witnessed in the past century and will continue to see in the future. Celebrate today by learning more about the history of the internet, how it has influenced your life, and the telling your friends on social media to celebrate too!

If you are interested in learning more about our degrees in Software Development, Cybersecurity, and Game Design call us at (858) 499-0202 and schedule a tour! There are thousands of jobs for programmers and coders across the nation, and we want to help you get started in your dream career today!

Share Button