What is Software Development?

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So you’ve been thinking about software development? You’ve imagined yourself in front of a computer screen writing the next great mobile application or piece of software, and working as an important member of a powerful team. Well, that scenario is actually pretty accurate, but there is more to being a software developer, or engineer than you might think. Read on to find out more about what it means to be a software developer and how you can put yourself on the path to a rewarding technical career.

A Software Development career requires a broad range of skills. The process can be challenging and those who succeed are willing to do the hard work. In addition to working with clients and other professionals, developers create a set of design patterns or algorithms that form the foundation for usable software. They also recommend upgrades or changes to existing software. They maintain detailed records supporting all work products. Some practitioners work in vibrant groups with other designers and some are freelance developers who work independently to create software for single users or smaller companies.

Software developers are detail-oriented. They are eternal optimists who trust that with effort they can succeed. They are meticulous in crafting, testing and improving the software. This field, according to the Department of Labor’s Professions Outlook is wide open with opportunities to make a good income and opportunities for advancement. This is expected to remain true for years to come.

The Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC) for Coleman University Blog

                The Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC)

If this sounds like the type of career that you have been looking for, perhaps it is time to get back into the classroom and make software development your future career. Coleman University’s software development faculty has prepared a focused set of courses that supports gaining the necessary skills for success. A new class starts every 10 weeks and, with five enrollment times per year, and tutoring is offered to students for free. Coleman has a dedicated career services department to help you find that first job and will provide support throughout your career. A career in Software Development provides the basis for pride in craftsmanship and the comfort of working in professional teams.

 

Thank you to our Software Development Faculty Chair, Leticia Rabor for writing this great article! If you would like to learn more about Leticia check out her interview from last year when she visited the Android Developers Conference in San Francisco. Or check out her Faculty Spotlight interview here!

 

Coleman University has been a technology-focused institution of higher learning since 1963. Our accelerated Software Development program give students the opportunity to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in as little as three years (depending on course load). If this blog has inspired you to think about your future in Software Development give us a call at (858) 499-0202.

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Women’s History Month: Developing the Foundations for Modern Technology

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Last month we talked about the African American women who changed the face of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, despite adversity and oppression. Since March 1st marks the start of Women’s History Month, we are going to continue our acknowledgement of the women behind the modern technological age. We discussed the pioneers Ada Lovelace and Grace Hopper in a previous blog post (which you can read here) but there is a long list of women who have come after them who have created their own legacy in STEM. If there is someone missing from this list, feel free to add them in the comments!

Susan Kare
When you think of Apple, most likely you’ll picture Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak. Or maybe the first image that comes to mind will be the computer itself, a large and heavy object with a screen the size of a notepad. However, one of the names that you might not recognize is Susan Kare. Behind the scenes, she was in charge of developing the typography and iconic graphics for the launch of the original Apple Macintosh computer. Many of the interface elements that have become common in their products were designed by Kare, like the command symbol on their keyboard. Remember the “Happy Mac” that greeted you when you booted up your system? That was Susan Kare’s design!

Hedy Lamarr
You might not know Hedy Lamarr’s acting career, but you have definitely used her invention in your daily life now. She conceptualized the first ideas for frequency hopping (sending radio signals from different frequency channels). The basis for the idea was to help the Navy launch torpedos through remote control, and block communications from being interfered with. Despite the fact that this technology would have been way ahead of its time, the Navy was not interested and passed on the invention. However, Lamarr’s design would find its use in the 1950’s when the concept was used for secure military communications. This new use paved the way for Hedy Lamarr’s concept to become the foundation for modern Bluetooth and Wifi technology.

Roberta Williams
When videogames became popular in the 1980’s, the at-home console was a huge seller and brands like Atari took the market by storm. However there was a revolution coming and Roberta Williams was one of its leaders. It was her creation “King’s Quest” that would create the market for PC gaming. Her company Sierra On-Line would help to shape the future of video games with their more complex puzzle designs and storylines. Games that take the main character on a quest before they can compete against a final “boss” are inspired by her original design.

Radia Perlman
A member of the Internet Hall of Fame, Radia Perlman designed the spanning tree algorithm that transformed Ethernet from single-wire CSMA/CD into a protocol that can handle large information clouds. She also designed Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL), which allows Ethernet to make optimal use of bandwidth. Perlman holds over 100 patents and has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from Unisex and the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Data Communication. She holds BS and MS degrees in Mathematics from MIT, and completed her PhD in Computer Science through MIT as well.

Kimberly Bryant (Black Girls Code)
After earning her degree in Electrical Engineering from Vanderbilt University, and a successful career in the bay area near San Francisco, Bryant decided to dedicate her life to helping more African American women achieve their dreams in STEM. She founded Black Girls Code in 2011 to bring classes and workshops to her community that focused on helping underrepresented girls learn computer programming, coding, website development, and robotics. Her foundation now had chapters in seven states, and across the globe in Johannesburg, South Africa, and even offers programs in Spanish! To learn more about her organization and all of their community work visit: www.blackgirlscode.com

Sister Mary Kenneth Keller
Though she was a devout nun her whole life, Sister Mary Kenneth Keller was the first woman in the United States to earn a PhD in Computer Science. She entered into the convent in 1932, and earned her BS in Mathematics and her MS in Physics from DePaul University. However, it was during her time studying at Dartmouth College in the 1960s that she developed the BASIC computer language which made it possible for anyone to write custom code. Suddenly developers didn’t need to have a mathematics or science degree to be able to code their own programs. Keller’s dissertation, written in CDC FORTRAN 63, was titled “Inductive Inference on Computer Generated Patterns.” In 1965, she became the first American woman to earn a PhD in Computer Science. She envisioned a future of computers that would help teach and stimulate cognitive development for all.

Carol Shaw
Considered the first female professional video game designer, Carol Shaw worked for the Atari company programming games for the VCS console before leaving to work for Activision. The now famous River Raid game for the Atari 2600 was her design and is considered to be one of the best examples of game design in history. However, even though she was an equal member of the team, she still faced discrimination, even from the President of Atari. During a walk through, he remarked “Oh, at last! We have a female game designer. She can do cosmetics color matching and interior decorating cartridges!” You can read more about her life in game development on the Vintage Computing Website.

Adele Goldberg
A prominent software developer, Adele Goldberg is one of the designers of the SmallTalk-80 programming language. While working at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) she would become the manager of the System Concepts Laboratory where her team would finish the SmallTalk-80 program. She served as president of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) from 1984 to 1986, and, together with Alan Kay and Dan Ingalls, received the ACM Software Systems Award in 1987. Many of the concepts she and her team developed at PARC became the basis for graphically based user interfaces, replacing the earlier command line based systems.

There are thousands more women who have made great strides in technology development who also deserve recognition on this list. This month, take the opportunity to learn more about the extraordinary women who have made history in STEM. You can tell us about them here in the comments!

 

 

The first degree conferred by Coleman University (then the Automation Institute) was to a woman, for Data Processing in 1964. It has been our mission since we were first established to ensure that all of our students have equal access to education, and resources to pursue their passion to turn their ‘Dreams Into Reality’. What could you do with a degree in Software Development, Cybersecurity, or Game Development from Coleman University?

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Cybersecurity in History: The Elk Cloner Virus

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In 2017, Cybersecurity Ventures predicted that by 2019 a business will become the target of a ransomware attack every 14 seconds. The average budget for cybersecurity measures is expected to exceed $1 Trillion by 2021, and the number of open jobs for cybersecurity experts is fast outgrowing the number of available applicants (CSO Online). It seems that “cybersecurity” is a hot button topic today, but where did this trend start? Where did the first computer virus come from? In late January of 1982, a 15 year-old programmer named Richard Skrenta inadvertently created the first computer virus (outside of a lab) that spread through infected floppy discs “in the wild”. Ironically it was written as a joke!

The first computers, such as the ENIAC, were built at the beginning of the 20th century and were used mostly for computing large sums and for breaking codes during war time. These behemoth machines took up entire floors of buildings and required constant monitoring and maintenance. Over time these computers become smaller, faster, and more efficient, but they were still individual machines that worked towards a specific computing purpose. With the birth of the modern age of computing and the home computer system, programmers could begin experimenting with their own code and testing the limits of these inventions. Using his personal Apple II computer, Richard Skrenta began creating a boot sector virus to infect floppy discs and spread itself to any Apple II computer that booted up using the infected floppy disc by putting the virus into the computer’s memory. His virus would become the first in history to spread “in the wild” and exist outside of a computer laboratory; meaning that any floppy discs that were inserted into an infected computer, were immediately infected and could then pass the virus on to another system. The virus was essentially harmless and was intended to annoy its victims more than attack them. Elk Cloner was designed so that once the Apple II computer had been booted up 50 times after being infected, a poem would display on the screen:

Elk Cloner:

The program with a personality

It will get on all your disks

It will infiltrate your chips

Yes it’s Cloner!

It will stick to you like glue

It will modify ram too

Send in the Cloner!

Once computer developers began installing hard drives into computers instead of relying on floppy discs for memory, this type of virus was no longer effective. Today the threat of digital security is greater than an infected floppy disc that only affects the device you have in your home, and it can be much more detrimental to your system than an unwanted poem on your screen. In a report by ISACA it was projected that over the next 2-4 years there will be an estimated skills gap of almost 2 million in the field of Cybersecurity. The Cybersecurity industry is seeing a sharp spike in hacking attempts and recent scandals, such as the Equifax data breach in 2017, have shown that the cybersecurity needs of major corporations are not being met. Imagine what opportunities are waiting for you with a degree in Cybersecurity!  On average, a Cybersecurity professional will have a yearly salary of $116,000, almost double the national median income reported for 2016! If you have a passion for online safety and love a challenge, think of a degree in Cybersecurity as a part of your future and call us at (858) 499-0202!

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Cybersecurity is in Demand

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There are 1.8 Million Unfilled Cybersecurity Jobs in the United States,

So where are the Workers?

One of the fastest growing, and best paying, job fields in the United States is also becoming one of the least populated. According to the International Information System Security Certification Consortium, or (ISC)², by 2022 there will be an estimated 1.8 million jobs in Cybersecurity that will go unfilled. This number increased from the initial estimate in 2015 of 1.5 million by 2020. So why are these jobs sitting vacant?  Will they be filled at all? One of the most significant causes is the documented lack of interest by Millennials in Cybersecurity. In a recent study by the Center for Cybersafety and Education, only 7% of those cybersecurity professionals in the field who were surveyed are under the age of 29, while the vast majority is over the age of 40. That large majority is on the verge of retiring, and that shift will only increase the number of open jobs in this field. But the field of Cybersecurity isn’t that hard to get into. With a degree in Cybersecurity, or even experience in software development or programming, this career path is one in which anyone with an interest in technology can succeed.

 

An article from Forbes Magazine claims that the Millennial generation sees Cybersecurity from a different perspective than their older peers (such as their parents and grandparents) because they have grown up living with computer and internet technology as part of their everyday lives. The concerns that face younger generation online, such as the security of cloud-based platforms, and password-protected sites, are much different than when the internet was first established. Ironically Millennials are MORE aware of cyber threats than previous generations, but they are less likely than Baby-boomers to take extra precautions to safeguard their information and documentation, especially on social media. On average, a Millennial will use 3-5 passwords for their various profiles in order to ensure security; however, that proactive behavior doesn’t seem to translate into an interest in Cybersecurity because this group tends to reuse the same password for multiple sites. Unfortunately there is not enough awareness of this career field in comparison to other technology-focused options to bring more students into the classroom. Compounding this lack of interest are the assumptions that Cybersecurity is the same as any other IT field and that there is no need to specialize, or that years of extensive training are needed to become a high-level security expert. Those assumptions are very wrong.

Every year in the U.S., 40,000 jobs for information security analysts go unfilled, and employers are struggling to fill 200,000 other cyber-security related roles, according to cyber security data tool CyberSeek

Many Cybersecurity specialists only need a few years of training in order to obtain an entry-level security position. The average salary for a Cybersecurity professional according to CIO, citing a survey conducted by Semper Secure, is around $116,000 annually (roughly $55.77 per hour). More specialized positions such as Chief Information Security Officer, or Lead Software Security Engineer, have an average salary of $200,000. That number is three times the national median income! In fact, many of the almost 1.8 million jobs in Cybersecurity are located right here in California. Companies such as Google, IBM, Cisco, and Facebook have a high demand for Cybersecurity specialists and that demand will only grow in the next ten years as cloud-based computing becomes more prevalent. Those cybersecurity specialists who take and maintain high level certifications such as the CISSP are more likely to achieve an even higher salary!

 

In order to make a career in cybersecurity more accessible, Coleman University created an expedited degree program of three years or less (depending on status and credits transferred) for a Bachelor’s of Science in Cybersecurity. Students earn their degree while also taking advantage of our Career Services department to find jobs in the field. Alumni also have the advantage of a lifetime of career services assistance from our experienced advisers.

 

If you have been looking for a more lucrative career, and have a passion for technology and making the online world more secure, think about Cybersecurity as your future! With the growing demand for professionals, and over a million potential jobs to choose from, this field has plenty of opportunity for those who want to take it. At Coleman University, we can make that goal happen faster, and with the help of our instructors who have years of experience in the field and in the classroom. Call Coleman today at (858) 499-0202 to schedule a tour!

 

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Faculty Spotlight: Ben Mead

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This month we sat down with an instructor from our Software Development Department, Ben Mead for an interview about his life in technology and his passions. From his early interest in technology, to his current role as an instructor at Coleman University, there is a lot to know about Ben! Read on to find out something new about one of your favorite instructors on our campus.

Have you always lived in San Diego? What was it like growing up in Southern California?

While at this point I’ve been in San Diego for most of my life, I can still wear shorts year round and sometimes find myself longing for a snow day. Nevertheless, this is the city I love and call home.

What was the first experience that you had with technology that inspired you to make it your career?

Growing up on Oregon Trail and the NES showed me there is a lot of fun to be had with electronics. However, it wasn’t until middle school during a Basic Apple class where I thought, “this is what I want to spend my time doing.” I thought it was so cool to write a program that could create a simple pixel police car and make it drive across the screen blinking its light along the way. I was instantly hooked on computers, as they provided me the satisfaction and feedback I needed as a young teen. It did what I what I asked it to do. It also let me know real quickly when I made a mistake, without judgment, and I could then fix it.

What is one of your favorite subjects to teach in your classes?

As a technologist by trade, I am able to bring an experienced perspective, from working in the industry, to my students. One of the benefits of teaching in the Cybersecurity program at Coleman University is that I get to relate each of the classes I teach to current event examples of how criminals and law enforcement are leveraging technology to work through their operational challenges. Additionally, I enjoy creating open forum conversations with each class as they work through team dynamics and coordinated obstacles, so that together they are able to produce an outcome greater than they would individually.

How do you think TV and other media have changed the way that people think about technology and hacking?

Hollywood and the media are hilarious with the way they portray technology and those who use it! They portray outrageous and beyond reasonable examples, ranging from exploding monitors in soap operas to typing the word “cookie” to stop a cookie monster virus. More often than not, the overdramatic misinformation takes away from the beauty of modern technology and the terrifying reality of what is happening in the hacking scene today.

Do you have one type of tech that you can’t live without in your daily life?

Convenience is a key reason anyone adopts a technology. I find myself pretty resourceful but my go-to convenience for work and play has got to be my smartphone. It grants me the ability to terminal in from anywhere and check out the latest cat gif (pronounced like a gift and not like the peanut butter JIF).

What activities or hobbies do you like that have as little to do with tech as possible?

The least tech hobby I’ve got is playing paintball. It’s just so satisfying laying rope down a lane and watching someone run right through it!

How long have you been teaching at Coleman? What’s your favorite class to teach?

The last two years teaching at Coleman have been a fun and enriching experience. It’s hard to pick one class that I’ve enjoyed the best, as each of them has been awesome in their own way.

Do you have any resources, like books or websites, that you recommend for good information about coding and programming?

I recommend that anyone looking for more information on learning coding and programming should talk to one of our Admissions Consultants about what they’re looking to accomplish and how Coleman University can help.

 

 

 

If you are interested in learning about all that you can accomplish with a degree in technology, call us today to set up an appointment with one of our admissions representatives at (858) 499-0202. We are here Monday through Friday to answer all of your questions and help you get started on the path to a lifelong career in technology!

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Coleman is Ranked #1 in San Diego!

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Recently our University was pleased to find that we had been ranked number one in San Diego for Cybersecurity degrees by Universities.com. If you did not already know, Coleman has had the longest running Cybersecurity (formerly Network Security) degree program in San Diego. Since 1963 when we first began our journey as The Automation Institute, our organization has been at the center of technology development and we have graduated many distinguished alumni over our 54 years in Southern California. From Data Processing to Cybersecurity we have come a long way by following the trends and seeing the potential in every student that walks through our door.  Our alumni have gone on to work for SPAWAR, Cisco, Kyocera, and many other incredible companies that are the leaders in technology development. With our lifetime Career Services access and small class sizes our students have been able to create lucrative careers in exciting fields. More importantly, they have brought integrity to the Coleman name and we are proud to continue to provide a top Cybersecurity education for San Diego. Our mission statement is “To deliver relevant education that prepares individuals for technology focused careers, while providing an environment where they may develop to their full potential” and we will remain dedicated to that mission long into our future. This is exciting news for our university and we are so happy to share it with our followers and alumni!!

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Ransomware Global Strike: The “WannaCry” Attack

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In the height of the westward expansion into California, the “Wild West” became not only a place, but a term that described an entire cultural phenomenon. What made the west so wild were the apparent lawless territories that saw hostile takeovers, train and carriage robberies, kidnapping, and ransoming. Over time the west was settled and developed into new states with their own laws and regulations. The wild part of the west was no longer a threat, at least in the physical world. Today we have a new and almost lawless place, however this territory only exists online. Though there are plenty of companies and programs that work 24/7 to ensure safety online, there are still opportunities for malicious attacks to be carried out. The robberies and takeovers that plagued the westward expansion have now become digital.

A typical scam that you will see online is the email phishing that we talked about in a previous blog. These scams can be easy to avoid as long as the recipient is not engaging with the email or providing any personal information. Unfortunately that does not always protect online users from being attacked for their information. Ransomware has become a bigger threat that is hard to trace and causes an incredible amount of damage. Essentially it is software that takes all of a victim’s personal files and information and holds it for a ransom that must be paid. Recently a large ransomware attack has become global news, with at least 150 countries experiencing the same attack. The most affected victims were the small businesses, universities, and hospitals that were unable to protect themselves and had to either pay the ransom or risk losing all of their data (CNN Money). Reports from China, Germany, Japan, Russia, the US, and Spain confirmed that there had been attacks from the same ransomware and that they had taken the necessary precautions to try and stop its spreading.

Through a patch in the Microsoft Windows software, the ransomware “WannaCrypt” was able to target specific users and take over their systems. Ransomware works as a lock box for your data, keeping you from accessing any of your files or personal information unless you agree to the terms and conditions set up by the creator. Victims were told to use Bitcoin to pay for the return of their files (Microsoft). Many of the Windows users who were targeted were not using an updated, or a licensed version of this software making them even more vulnerable to patches that could not be fixed in the Microsoft updates. In the wake of this viral attack, Microsoft released a statement outlining the efforts they were making to avoid these attacks in the future. However, they also called on the public to become more aware of their own responsibility in updating their computers and backing up their information with an external drive and cloud software. Proactive actions are the key to being safe online. This idea of being proactive is also what stopped the ransomware attack from continuing to spread. A young cybersecurity student in the UK decided to look more closely at the software behind the attack and discovered a kill switch. The malware was using “a very long nonsensical domain name that the malware makes a request to – just as if it was looking up any website – and if the request comes back and shows that the domain is live, the kill switch takes effect and the malware stops spreading” (The Guardian). Once the student located the domain name, all he had to do was buy it. The domain cost $10.69 and was immediately registering thousands of connections every second; once it was purchased the malware was stopped in its tracks. Additionally once this domain was bought he was able to determine the IP addresses attached to the malware and reported them to the authorities. Though this was a great victory, in the world of Cybersecurity it is just a temporary fix. There are just as many entities creating malware as there are cybersecurity experts trying to stop them. What makes this malware attack so dangerous is that it can be replicated and reused at any time.

Backing up files, or storing information in the Cloud, and regularly updating your software are the best measures you can take to protect yourself from ransomware. As we mentioned in a previous blog on email phishing, it is imperative that you avoid any email from a company or bank that is asking for your personal information via email.

If you are interested in becoming a cybersecurity expert yourself, consider a degree from Coleman University. Perhaps it could be you that stops the next big cyber-attack in its tracks! Call (858) 499-0202 for information on our technology focused programs.

 

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Phishing Isn’t a Sport

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Six tips from Coleman University on how to keep your email safe from phishing scams.

Cybersecurity is a hot button topic lately. With the rumors of Russian infiltration into the United States Presidential election, and the exposure of private emails and photos onto sites such as WikiLeaks, the privacy that we covet online is becoming increasingly endangered. With the recent phishing scam going through Google Docs, it is imperative to remember the necessary steps to take online in order to ensure that you are not a target of a scam. First, let’s review what online scamming/phishing looks like, and the ways to spot one.

The most likely scam that you will encounter is a phishing email that can be sent to your accounts. Phishing is defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary as “a scam by which an e-mail user is duped into revealing personal or confidential information which the scammer can use illicitly.” An email may look legitimate with logos and graphics, but that does not mean that it should be taken at face value. For example, banks have taken a stance against phishing by only allowing account actions to be completed through their own websites or at a physical bank location. Your private bank will never ask you for passwords, social security numbers, account numbers, routing numbers, or any other private information via email (Telegraph.co.uk). Be on the lookout for emails that inform you of account changes or updates; if you did not authorize changes, immediately report this issue. The best course of action to protect yourself if you feel that you have been targeted by a scam is to document as much as you can with photos, emails, and phone calls. If an email comes into your inbox that seems suspicious call the company that supposedly sent it and ask about the email. Taking the initiative to validate the email before responding is one of the best ways to protect yourself from online threats. So what happened in regards to the Google Docs scam that went viral last week?

Gmail users were sent a notification from a known contact to click on a shared Google Doc. In order to access the document, the users had to authorize a transfer of contact information to the sender. Since the sender was perceived to be a friend or family member, there was little hesitation to allow this authorization. Routing the doc through an unauthorized Google Docs app prompted the Gmail user to allow the application to take control of their email information as a “management” tool (BGR.com). As a result, any personal information attached to contacts was downloaded and stored. Google reported shortly after this spamming went viral that over one million accounts were potentially compromised and the unauthorized application was shut down, as well as the email accounts that were the source of the scam. Information from email accounts linked to sites such as iTunes, Amazon, Twitter, and Facebook were the most vulnerable to this scam. Any users who had encountered this phishing email were asked to change their emails and passwords immediately. An interesting thing to note is that a majority of these emails were addressed to “hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh@mailinator.com” (Forbes.com).

One of the first things that you should look for when it comes to identifying phishing emails is the sender’s name, the name that they have addressed the email to, and the language they have used. If there are typos, or if the language is not clear, that should be your first indication that the email in question is not valid. Most often the email address of the sender will look like an official domain, but there could be minor differences such as a period between words, or a domain extension from another country such as “.ru” or “br”, which can be hard to miss. If links are provided in the body of the email, hover your cursor over them and the destination for the link should pop up. If an IP address comes up instead of the domain name, then the link could be fraudulent. Another item to look for is the tone of the message. If you receive an email that has a threat such as closure of an account, that tone is your best indication that the message is fraudulent. A good source of examples for phishing is the Microsoft website, which also lists the information for phishing phone calls and how to report phishing activity.

Taking that extra moment to evaluate an email is your best line of defense in keeping your private information safe. Make sure to update your email passwords and delete unwanted or fraudulent emails as soon as possible. If you are interested in how online security works, and want to learn more about protecting online identities think about the possibility of a career in Cybersecurity. This field is growing fast and will be a lucrative degree option long into the future. Call Coleman today to schedule an appointment and speak with an admissions counselor at (858) 499-0202 Monday through Friday.

 

 

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Network Security Commercial

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Here’s our new Network Security Commercial!

You can be on the front line of network defense and cyber security by turning your skills into a career in the Network Security program at Coleman University.

Secure networks and reliable transfer of data have become increasingly vital for successful businesses. Network Security professionals are needed to build, manage, maintain a stronger and safer digital world.

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