Coleman Alumnus Cornelius Simon is Chosen as the Keynote Speaker for Graduation 2018

Share Button

Cornelius Simon, a Coleman University alumnus, will be the keynote speaker for the graduation ceremony on May 19th.

Coleman University is pleased to announce that it will hold its 55th Anniversary Commencement on Saturday, May 19, 2018, at 9:00am at the Spreckels Organ Pavilion in Balboa Park. In honor of Armed Forces Day, our Keynote Speaker and Faculty Speaker are US Navy veterans who will be sharing their experiences with graduates as they address their accomplishment. The Color Guard presenting at the ceremony will be from Wounded Warrior Battalion-West at Camp Pendleton.

“We invited Cornelius Simon to be our Keynote Speaker this year in keeping with our tradition of inviting notable alumni to speak to our graduates,” said Coleman University President & CEO Norbert Kubilus.  “Cornelius is a great example of our alumni turning their dreams into reality. After separating from the US Navy, Cornelius came to then Coleman, received his degree, and turned his understanding of business and technology into a successful career as a software engineer and eventually into management roles. Cornelius is now a corporate trainer and speaker, specializing in professional skills development, mentoring emerging leaders within organizations and helping professionals transition into entrepreneurship.”

Capt. Tem E. Bugarin, DBA USN (Ret.) has been selected by the Faculty to be the Faculty Speaker at graduation.  Dr. Bugarin holds the distinction of being the first person born in the Philippines to command a Navy warship, USS Saginaw (LST 1188), in August 1989. In addition to teaching at Coleman University, he is a scientist with SPAWAR Systems Command in San Diego.

Coleman University is also honored to have the Wounded Warrior Battalion-West from Camp Pendleton, CA provide the Color Guard for this year’s commencement.  The Wounded Warrior Battalion focuses on the whole Marine – mind, body, spirit, family – in addressing recovery and transition needs of wounded Marines. “We are grateful to our friends at the Wounded Warrior Foundation and Freedom Village for helping arrange this Color Guard for us,” observes President Kubilus.

The San Diego Civic Organist will provide music for the ceremony on the historic Spreckels Organ.  This is a public event. All family and friends are welcome.

 

About Coleman University: Coleman University is a private non-profit teaching university founded in 1963 and located in San Diego, California. Its technology-focused undergraduate and graduate programs prepare individuals for careers and leadership in their chosen fields. As San Diego’s oldest school dedicated to information technology, Coleman University has historically educated a large number of the region’s business-technology professionals. www.coleman.edu.

Share Button

Coleman Sponsors the National Diversity Council for Women’s History Month

Share Button

Many of our community members know the name Coleman Furr, and they know that he is the namesake of our institution. However, what you may not know is that our university was co-founded by a woman. Louis Furr was a visionary in the same way that her husband was, and she too saw a future for technology that included everyone with a passion to learn. In her memory, and the memory of all the women that we have taught since 1963, Coleman has been an avid proponent of diversity in the STEM fields. We continue to look for ways to engage the community around this important topic, especially in regards to encouraging more women to establish a career in technology. During Women’s History month, we sponsored and hosted the California Diversity Council for their Women in Leadership: Women Blazing Trails symposium which took place on March 14th. Female leaders from all over Southern California were on our campus discussing their personal experience with adversity and challenges in their careers.

The panel of speakers included Stacie Herring, Vice President of Consumer Services Experience at Intuit, Angelica Espinoza, Vice President of Compliance and Governance and Corporate Secretary at Sempra Energy, Sadie Stern, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer at 3D Systems, Judy Wright. Vice President of Human Resources for Valley View Casino & Hotel, Denise Brucker, Vice President of Compliance, Labor & Employment for Cubic Corporation, and Dr. Ilkay Altintas, the Chief Data Officer for the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego. Leading the panel as moderator was Dr. Merrilyn Datta, the Head of Business Operations at Illumina, who engaged the audience with her own stories of her experiences and engaging attendees in a powerful discussion. Some of the main points of discussion that came to light were the importance of speaking your mind, being unafraid to ask for more resources, and taking risks in expanding your horizons.

From culturally conscious leadership, to swimming with sharks and building a value for your personal brand, the panelists covered important topics and invited attendees to ask questions. Many members of the audience had the opportunity to establish important networking connections, and learn more about resources available to them in San Diego. The National Diversity Council will be hosting many more events like this one here in California, if you are interested in attending please visit the events page on their website.

Share Button

Coleman Game Development Capstone is a Huge Success!

Share Button

Finals can be a hard time for any student, but for our Capstone class, this week was harder than most. For the past ten weeks, two student teams have been working overtime to complete a game of their own design, but their last big challenge was to show off their hard work to an audience, for a grade! We attended their presentations and we were blown away at what we saw. Both teams put together great concepts that translated into exciting games that we hope to see produced as full games in the future. All members of the audience were given the opportunity to offer their opinions on the presentation anonymously through a worksheet that their instructor, Joe Shoopack, designed to gauge audience perception on playability and overall concept.

Both Team Jekyll and Team Hyde had to present and discuss where their game idea came from, which roles the team members took on, and the challenges that they faced while working together and working on their own. Team Hyde presented their game, Path of the Warded, which is based on a book, which takes place in a fantasy world overrun with demons that are set on destroying everything in sight. The main character has to wait until nightfall in order to protect his farm and the animals that live there. Team Jekyll showed us Malice, a game that was a three-year dream of project manager Marisa Hatcher, which took the main character on a quest to save her sister from kidnappers. The audience followed their presentations as the teams broke down their work flow and the various pieces of the game that each member was responsible for, and how their designs changed over time. Though this class was a great learning experience, it came with its fair share of difficult challenges that, in the end, taught the students what it’s like to work in a real-world game developer environment. This class is also a great example of why it is important, as a Game Developer, to be able to work in various job titles or departments. If you can better understand what it is that your teammates do, and how to help when it is needed, the more versatility you will bring to your job.

Once the presentations were over, the audience was given the chance to ask questions about the game and then was brought to the development lab and took their turns playing the games and seeing first-hand how the games worked. All of the attendees were really excited to see the results of these projects and had a great time hearing directly from the students about their experiences. You can check out the photo album below for more photos of the presentations and behind-the-scenes images of the production process. Congratulations to the Capstone class! We see a very bright and successful future in Game Development for all of you!

Share Button

Women Who Coded in War Time: the Forgotten Veterans

Share Button

War is not just the physical action that takes place on the battlefield. During the First World War technology development became the best form of defense against enemy attack. In fact, war time intelligence gathering and monitoring was a field largely dominated by women, and it was their dedication to code breaking that helped win the war for the Allies in World War Two. However, many of these women have gone unrecognized by history. As part of our dedication to diversity, Coleman University wants to bring more attention to these veterans who helped end World War 2, and foster a larger dialogue about the women who have become invaluable pioneers in technology.

It is estimated that there are over 10,000 women who contributed to war time code breaking; but most of them have never been recognized for their achievements. It was a woman who was the first the learn that World War Two was over after she decoded a message sent from Japan to neutral Switzerland offering an unconditional surrender. It was also a woman who helped Alan Turing build his computing engine in Bletchley Park, Great Britain, that helped to decipher the codes being sent by the Nazis. So why were these incredible women left out of the conversation about war time efforts?

In the same way that women took over in factories and in mills to help the war effort, those who enlisted ended up taking over the jobs that men would have held in other times. Though the CIA was still in its infancy, they were in a rush to hire as many workers as possible to get ahead of the growing stack of coded intelligence that needed to be deciphered. Ironically men were hesitant to join the code breakers because it was considered menial work, and honor and prestige was believed to be earned on the battlefield. The women who would help break codes and save millions of lives left their homes under the pretense of being hired to do secretarial work for the government, and were sworn to severe secrecy at the potential cost of the safety of the country. It was this dedication to secrecy that led many of the women to avoid speaking about their experiences to anyone, including their own families. Their jobs consisted of sifting through thousands of messages, often taking weeks to decode even one.

It was these women who would be the first to learn that their loved ones were the target of an attack, or that their hometowns had been bombed, but often they were helpless to stop it. They willingly took on the burden of having to know top secret information that directly affected the war, yet they had to be as secretive about their work as the messages they were decoding. However they did get some of their own action in the war, by creating phony messages for the Germans to intercept that would affect the attack on Normandy known as D-Day. The contributions of these code breakers is almost immeasurable considering how much their work would further the development of the code breaking computers and machines that would come after the war was over. Only an extremely small number of women who were code breakers during the war stayed on to continue their careers. Many moved back to civilian life and never spoke of their involvement in the war again. As we celebrate the veterans who have fought for our nation in and out of wartime, we must also stop and think about the women who were not on the front lines but who still dedicated their lives to helping the war effort. These forgotten veterans are part of the deep history of women who have contributed to the STEM fields and whose legacy must be celebrated and must continue to be celebrated for future generations.

 

 

Coleman University values providing an equal opportunity for all who are interested to establish a career in technology. What could you do with a degree in cybersecurity, software development, or game development? Call us today at (858) 499-0202 to find out!

Coleman University logo

Share Button

How To Get Started in a Career in Game Development and Design

Share Button

Do you want an exciting career in game development and design? Unfortunately, it takes more than just a love of video games to be successful. Luckily, a Bachelor’s degree in game programming development and design from Coleman University can open the door to the myriad of opportunities the gaming industry has to offer. While many video game development careers may seem similar, a vast array of roles exists in the industry, ranging from creative functions (story development, artwork, music, etc.) to technical functions (coding, modeling, animation, etc.). At Coleman University, we offer a unique program that will prepare you for a rewarding career in game development and design by teaching you the skills and technologies that prospective employers look for in an applicant.

With such a wide array of potential career options, it befits you to determine which path is right for you, based on your interests, skills, and abilities. Though falling under the video game development and design umbrella, the distinct career paths all possess their own necessary skills and experiences. Can you draw? Concept art may be the right path for you! Are you a coding whiz? You just may be the next great game mechanics engineer! Let’s look at a few possible careers and what they look for in a candidate.

Game Designers are the architects of video game creation. They develop a vision of what the game will look like, how it plays, and how the various teams of developers will work together to bring that vision to life. First and foremost, game designers have to understand what gamers want and how to bring that demand to the screen. Once an idea for a game has been pitched, it is the game designer’s responsibility to determine which genre, platform, and game engine would suit the concept best. Once the foundation has been built, the game designer will lay out the fundamental concepts of the game, including characters, setting, and story. Each of these concepts will then be broken down further to include levels, landscapes, missions, and other central models that will ultimately shape how the gamer will interact with the game. Simply put, game designers see the big picture for every project.

Game programmers take the outline provided by the game designer and bring it to life through code. Since video games are essentially self-contained software packages, game programmers must be familiar with various coding languages, such as C++ (the most popular), Java, and C#. Another option that game studios utilize when developing a new game is the use of game engines. Game engines are basically pre-built software templates that programmers use to expedite the development process. They generally contain the game studio’s preferred physics engines, rendering engine, and animation bundles, among other things. The Coleman University Gaming Development and Design program will prepare students to master arguably the two most popular game engines available today: Unity and Unreal. Though used to accomplish similar tasks, these game engines possess different attributes, strengths, and limitations that prospective employers expect applicants to be able to navigate. With these tools at their disposal, game programmers can dictate characters interaction with the environment, commands from the player, and other characters.

Animators are responsible for the movements and interactions of characters and the environment. Much like game programmers, animators utilize a specialized software package to determine how things interact in the game. Though some games have cut scenes (a short movie within a game) that animators must design, most of the work comes from determining how the playable character moves within the environment. Early 2D games (like Mario and Pong) had fixed settings, because the hardware was not equipped to render advanced environments. However, with the advances in technology over the years, animators possess more freedom to explore the boundaries of what is possible within the construct of the game. With that said, animators are relied upon to portray the simulations as effectively as the hardware and software will allow. As a result, animators must be cognizant of the platform’s strengths and weakness, as well as the physics engine’s capabilities. With that said, this allows animators to create a cache of standardized character models that he or she can pull from in the future, rather than starting from scratch every time.

Video game tester may be the most sought after position in the video game industry, due to the nature of the role. Game testers provide quality assurance for studios by playing through upcoming games and discovering bugs or glitches. Generally, these positions are more entry-level than the others on this list, but still require the knowledge necessary to identify technical problems in the game. Video game testers also serve as the first focus group for a new game, as they are asked to give feedback about the strengths and weaknesses of each new project. Since video games are meant to be vessels of enjoyment, studios count on testers to determine if the gameplay is conducive to fun.

Though an education is important, experience is the most crucial requirement for a career in game design and development. In an effort to provide additional hands-on experience, Coleman University encourages students to work on independent game projects, as well as participate in two “Game Jams” per year. A game jam is a game development marathon that can last up to 48 hours and is meant to be collaborative. Generally, game jams bring people together in a single location, and participants are given a theme on which to base their game. By bringing people together, students have the opportunity to bounce ideas off of each other, ask questions, and receive feedback from their classmates and instructors. Though they only have 48 hours to produce a prototype, many developers go on to complete their games afterwards. By designing and programming their own games, students receive the opportunity to experience the responsibilities and tasks that accompany a career in game design and development. It also allows the students an opportunity to create a portfolio of their work, which can set an applicant apart when applying for jobs after graduation. As a matter of fact, some of the assets created are used in actual games!

Though the gaming industry encompasses many roles, the most basic (and valuable) skill is the ability to code. Many industry experts would recommend learning C++, as it is the most widely used. When pursuing careers in the industry, being able to present a game (even a rudimentary game) that you produced will be invaluable, as it proves to employers that you have the skills and knowledge to do what they are looking for. From there, more often than not, you will begin as a game tester. This role allows you to display your understanding of how a game should play and how to fix glitches. It also comes with the added benefit of playing video games for a living! Once you prove your worth, you have the opportunity to branch out to any of the jobs listed above (and many more). Unlike many professions, the foundational knowledge and skills allow designers and developers to dabble in multiple roles. Though some people do specialize, there is simply more crossover in the video game industry than others.

The video game business is ever-evolving due to its reliance on technology. As new technologies are developed, new breakthroughs in video gaming will follow. With an industry larger than that of Hollywood, studios are pouring more and more money into blockbuster titles. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 6% increase in video game designer and developer jobs over the next eight years. Advancements in virtual reality or similar technology may cause a massive boom for an already promising industry. Though a love for video games is not sufficient for a career in the gaming industry, Coleman University’s Game Design and Development degree program can equip you with the tools and knowledge to pursue your passion for the world of video games.

Share Button

Marine Corps Birthday!

This gallery contains 10 photos.

On November 10th, 1775, the Second Continental Congress established the Continental Marines. The have continued to serve with honor to this day. Join us in our Veterans Center on Tuesday, November 10th, at 12pm and 5pm, as we honor the Marines and celebrate their birthday! Brought to you by the Diversity… More